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Vegetable

All Vegetable Content

A variety of fresh vegetables displayed on a white countertop.

Choosing Vegetable Varieties for South Dakota

Fact sheet describing characteristics to look for when selecting a vegetable variety to grow in South Dakota.

A pair of hands transplanting a tomato seedling in a black, plastic pot.

Growing Your Own Food

Are you thinking about growing your own fresh vegetables this year, maybe for the first time? In addition to the satisfaction of providing fresh, nutritious and delicious produce for yourself and family or friends, many find working with plants and soil to be a great antidote for the worries and frustrations of the day.

To small pumpkins sitting on a kitchen counter.

Preserving Pumpkin

Pumpkins are a staple for the fall season. They can often be seen used to decorate homes or for carving jack-o'-lanterns, but they’re great to eat or can for later too!

Black beetles with orange or yellow spots feeding on a ripe tomato.

Insects are Invading My Produce!

Ripe fruit that has been injured as well as ground fall fruits often attract undesirable insects into an area.

Woody looking zucchini plant.

What’s Killing My Zucchini and Squash Plants?

For many of us, this time of year is tough for our zucchini, squash and pumpkin plants. A close inspection of wilting plants may reveal a sawdust-like substance around the soil surface or on the base of the stem. When pushed, the plants typically break and reveal clear evidence of insect feeding through the stem.

Black and grey bugs of different sizes feeding on a yellow squash.

Squash Bugs in Zucchini

Squash bugs are now becoming a headache for gardeners across South Dakota. Most of the reports so far have been on zucchini plants, but squash bugs feed on pumpkins and other types of squash as well. Injury caused by extensive feeding appears as wilting and may result in the death of infested plants.

A color-coded map indicating the average date of 32 degree temperatures across various Midwestern states.

Fall Frost and September Climate Outlook for 2019

This year’s struggles with weather and climate are continuing this fall. Late planting of corn and soybeans in the spring have now combined with near average or cooler than average summertime temperatures. This combination has led to slow crop growth and the need for an extended frost-free season to ensure these crops reach maturity.

A Kohlrabi plant with broad, frost-covered green leaves.

Fall Frost Tolerance of Common Vegetables

Vegetables vary widely in how much cold they can tolerate as they reach maturity.

A green squash vine with a large, yellow flower blooming from it.

Saving Seed of Pumpkins, Squash, Cucumbers, Melons and Gourds

If gardeners wish to save seed from cucurbits (squash, pumpkins, gourds, cucumbers, and melons), special precautions need to be observed, as these plants are insect-pollinated.