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Vegetable

All Vegetable Content

steaks in a pan with a meat thermometer

Family Food Cent$ newsletters

The Family Food Cent$ Newsletter is published by the SDSU Extension Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) through a partnership with the South Dakota Department of Social Services.

Variety of vegetable seedlings growing in small containers near a windowsill.

Vegetables

Whether you are a beginner or have a green thumb, our tips will help your garden flourish.

Two rows of leafy, salad greens growing in a garden.

How to Grow It: Salad Greens

Salad greens, grown for their leaves, are cool-season crops. Most salad greens can be planted very early in the spring, and many will germinate in soil temperatures as low as 40° Fahrenheit.

A colorful variety of freshly, harvested bell peppers.

How to Grow It: Peppers

Peppers are heat-loving vegetables that require a long, frost-free season and full sun. Peppers can be sweet or hot, and range in color from green, yellow, orange, red and purple to brown.

Row of beets growing in a garden.

How to Grow It: Beets

Beets are commonly grown for their bulbous roots, but their tops can also be harvested for greens, and they are an excellent source of Vitamin A as well as calcium. They grow best in the cooler temperatures of spring or fall.

Zucchini ready to harvest. Courtesy: Mary Roduner

How to Grow It: Summer Squash

There are many types of summer squash, including the familiar zucchini (which can be green, green-striped, or yellow), crookneck, straightneck, patty pan and more.

Black beetles with orange or yellow spots feeding on a ripe tomato.

How Do I Keep Insects From Destroying My Garden Produce?

It is not unusual to see insects in a garden during the fall, but it can be frustrating to watch nearly ripe produce be destroyed by insects before it can be picked.

a variety of bright colored fruits and vegetables arranged on a table

A Guide to Drying Foods

Fact sheet about drying foods

fruit and vegetable garden with raised beds

Vegetable Gardening in South Dakota

Whatever your reasons to start a vegetable garden: fresh produce with great flavor, exercise, saving money, enticing children (and adults) to eat healthier food, or knowing where your food came from and how it was grown, this booklet will help you with basic information and tips to get started.

A crate filled with fresh vegetables.

Blossom End Rot on Tomatoes and Other Vegetables

Publication about the symptoms, causes and management of blossom end rot on tomatoes and other vegetables.