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Vegetables

The one time of year that almost all gardeners look forward to is the arrival of the first new garden catalogs of the year. These usually start arriving right in December with the real flood of colorful catalogs showing up in our mailboxes after the beginning of the New Year. 

How to Grow It

Several bundles of fresh carrots on display at a farmers market.

How to Grow It: Carrots

Carrot is a hardy, cool-season vegetable. Carrots are eaten both raw and cooked and they can be stored for winter use.

Cucumbers growing on a vine in a garden.

How to Grow It: Cucumbers

Some cucumber varieties form long vines that may ramble or be trellised. Others are bush types that fit more easily into a small garden or even a large container.

Green beans growing a garden.

How to Grow It: Green Beans

Snap beans, also called “green beans” or “string beans” (although most modern varieties do not have strings) are harvested when the pods contain immature seeds, and the pods are still succulent.

A lush, green cluster of garden peas with several pods developed.

How to Grow It: Peas

The most common type of pea in American gardens is the shelling pea, also called the “garden pea” or “English pea.” Tender, sweet peas are removed from thin, tough pods before eating.

Upcoming Events

Variety of home-canned, pickled vegetables on a silver table in a kitchen.
Sep 22

Food Preservation @ Home

SDSU Extension will be offering a 9-week Food Preservation series, every other Tuesday starting on June 2 at 10 AM CDT/ 9 AM MDT.

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Vegetable