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Crop Management

All Crop Management Content

a tractor in a field spraying soybeans
Feb 14

2020 Private Applicator Certification

SDSU Extension will host private pesticide applicator trainings throughout the southeast region of South Dakota beginning in early January through March.

Chemical Safety, Cover Crops, Crop Treatments, Crop Management, Corn, Forage, Field Pea, Flax, Oats, Oilseed, Pulse Crops, Sorghum, Soybean, Sunflower, Wheat

SDSU Extension to Host 2020 No-Till Event in Wall, S.D.

December 11, 2019

Join us for a free event that will highlight building soil and integrating livestock to farm systems in western SD. Registration is requested, event is free.

Corn, Wheat, Crop Management, Conservation, Soil Health

hand examining clump of soil organic matter

Managing Soil: Maximizing Profit Workshop to be Held Dec. 3 in Colton

November 19, 2019

SDSU Extension will host the “Managing Soil: Maximizing Profit” workshop in Colton on Dec. 3.

Corn, Soil Fertility, Soil Health, Cover Crops, Crop Management, Conservation

A group of white cattle standing in a feedlot.

Feeding Value of Light Test Weight Corn

Whether due to planting delays, a cooler growing season, or an unexpectedly early frost, stress factors sometimes result in crops that do not meet standard test weight requirements. So how does reduced test weight affect the feeding value of corn and cattle performance?

A green tractor planting seeds in a no-till field. Courtesy: United Soybean Board [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

Farm Practices That Improve Soil Health: Crop Rotations and No-Till

Implementing diverse crop rotations and no-till practices are common suggestions to reduce erosion, control pests, and improve yields. These practices can also improve soil health through an increase in soil carbon levels.

A patch of switchgrass growing at the edge of a field.

Farm Practices That Improve Soil Health: Planting Switchgrass on Marginal Lands

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is a tall, native, prairie grass that is often seeded on marginal lands in South Dakota. It has gained growing popularity over the past decade not only as a source of biofuel and feed, but also as a method to improve soil properties.

A field with patches of soil exhibiting poor water infiltration.

Farm Practices That Improve Soil Health: Cover Crops and Crop Residues

Planting cover crops and returning crop residues (stover) to the soil both adds nutrients and improves overall soil quality. These practices are common with producers across South Dakota and have been recently studied by researchers to identify how they impact the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

A group of cattle grazing on crop residue.

Farm Practices That Improve Soil Health: Integrated Crop-Livestock Systems

An integrated crop-livestock system can provide an alternative management strategy that benefits producer’s income, soil health, and the environment—all while increasing production.

Gibberella ear rot and Fusarium spp. symptoms on two corn ears.

Gibberella and Fusarium Ear Rots Developing in Corn

Corn ear rots are one of the last diseases to scout for in the corn growing season, and sometimes they are ignored or forgotten entirely. Ear rots can cause yield loss in the form of grain quality at harvest, but also cause losses during storage.