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Crop Management

All Crop Management Content

A stunted planting of corn with purple coloring on its leaves.

Fallow Syndrome: What is it and how do I deal with it?

Fallow syndrome received its name from the dry plains states, where fields routinely benefited from the additional moisture available after a year where the ground was fallowed. Corn sometimes had symptoms of phosphorus deficiency when grown on this previously fallowed ground, thus it received its current name, “fallow syndrome.”

Green and yellow grasshopper with black chevron markings on hindlegs.

Should I Be Concerned About Grasshoppers When Planting Winter Wheat?

During 2019 we have received varying reports regarding grasshopper populations. Many reports have indicated that grasshopper numbers are down. However, we have also received reports of very large grasshopper populations in some areas of South Dakota. So why such a difference?

A color-coded map indicating the average date of 32 degree temperatures across various Midwestern states.

Fall Frost and September Climate Outlook for 2019

This year’s struggles with weather and climate are continuing this fall. Late planting of corn and soybeans in the spring have now combined with near average or cooler than average summertime temperatures. This combination has led to slow crop growth and the need for an extended frost-free season to ensure these crops reach maturity.

Weeds growing in a recently harvested winter wheat field.

Winter Wheat Decisions

Winter wheat planting will soon be starting and a number of decisions will have to be made for a successful winter wheat crop, including: the time of planting, the choice of variety to be planted, disease and pest management decisions and crop insurance.

Three South Dakota fields that claimed prevent plant. The first field is planted with a cover crop. The second field has no cover crops, but tillage was completed to control weeds. The third has no cover crops and weeds are growing throughout.

Prevent Plant: Its Effect on Fall and Spring Fertilizing Plans

Driving around South Dakota, you can see the many acres that farmers were not able to plant. Now that fall soil-sampling season is well on its way, many people have questions regarding how different situations of prevented planting will affect soil sampling and fertilizer application needs.

A young man in a gray shirt and white cap scouting a soybean field for soybean aphids.

Should I Spray for Soybean Aphids? What’s the Threshold?

Although many soybean fields are behind schedule, so are the soybean aphid populations. In many reported areas, there are hotspots within a field where a few soybean plants may be heavily infested.

Soybean plant with with yellow-chlorotic blotches between leaf veins and noticable browning due to sudden death syndrome.

Sudden Death Syndrome Starting to Develop in Soybeans

Sudden death syndrome of soybean is starting to develop in soybean fields in South Dakota. Fields currently being found with sudden death syndrome have symptomatic plants scattered within the field, but continued disease development may lead to larger clusters of infected plants.

Green blades of rye growing amongst brown corn stalks.

Cereal Rye Cover Crop Between Corn and Soybean

Interest in cover crops has increased in recent times. Cereal rye has been a cover crop of choice among corn and soybean growers in South Dakota due to its superior tolerance to cold temperatures and ability to overwinter in a Northern climate.

Symptoms of three emerging sunflower diseases. From the left: Bacterial Stem Rot, Sclerotinia Basal Rot, and Sunflower Rust.

Bacterial Stem Rot, Sclerotinia Basal Rot and Sunflower Rust Developing in Sunflower

Sunflower scouted this week in Brookings and Kingsbury counties were found with bacterial stem rot, Sclerotinia basal rot and sunflower rust. This area has had plenty of moisture, which favors several diseases to develop in sunflower.

Soybean leaves with small, white lesions with red-to-purple halos throughout.

Frogeye Leaf Spot Developing in Soybeans

Frogeye leaf spot, also known as Cercospora leaf spot, was found in several soybean fields scouted the week of August 19, 2019. Frogeye leaf spot is characterized by irregular to circular lesions, which are tan-to-gray in color with reddish-purplish borders.