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Sheep Health

All Sheep Health Content

White goat resting in a drought-stressed pasture.

Heat Stress in Small Ruminants

The Upper Midwest provides periods of extreme heat during summer and shorter periods of heat stress potential during spring and fall. Are your sheep and goats cool enough in their environment?

Sheep at a freshly cleaned watering station.

Sheep Water Requirements and Quality Testing

Water intake is critical for ensuring flock health, performance and heat stress mitigation. Learn some key considerations for water quality and intake requirements.

small group of sheep standing in a pasture

Sheep & Goats

South Dakota ranks sixth nationally in sheep and wool production. And the industry is growing.

Breeding goat in a show pen.

Summer Sheep and Goat Show Sale Requirements

Summer is on the way and with it many sheep and goat shows and sales. Do you have the right documentation to be transporting your animals?

Barn damaged by a windstorm.

Tetanus: A Storm Aftermath Problem for Animals

Of all the challenges faced by animal caretakers in the wake of damaging storms, Tetanus is a potentially serious disease that might not appear for days or weeks later. Learn some expert tips for recognizing, treating and preventing it.

Veterinarian using a digital tablet in a sheep barn.

Clostridial Disease Management and Vaccines for Sheep and Goats

Vaccination against clostridium perfringens is universally recommended for small ruminants. Learn some expert vaccine considerations for both sheep and goats.

From left: Meadow deathcamas in a South Dakota prairie rangeland. Silvery Lupine in a rangeland in South Dakota.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Deathcamas and Lupine

With prolonged drought conditions throughout many areas of South Dakota, there is an increase of invasive weeds and poisonous plants on rangelands. Identification of poisonous plants is crucial to ensure livestock production is not compromised.

Low larkspur and twogrooved poisonvetch plants growing in rangeland.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Larkspur and Poisonvetch

Larkspurs are the second leading cause for all livestock deaths from toxic plant poisoning. Poisonvetches are considered accumulator plants that uptake excessive levels of selenium and cause toxicity problems in cattle.

Two poisonous rangeland plants. Left: Woolly Locoweed.  Right: Lambert Crazyweed (Purple Locoweed).

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Locoweed and Crazyweed

Locoweed and crazyweed are found throughout South Dakota rangelands, and both can cause livestock poisoning.The names locoweed and crazyweed are often used interchangeably. However, there are notable differences between the species.

Three poisonous rangeland plants. From left: Hemlock, Halogeton and Buffalo Bur.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Hemlock, Halogeton and Buffalo Bur

Several species of poisonous plants are invasive and can easily establish dense stands when there is a disturbance on rangelands. Hemlocks, halogeton and buffalo bur can all be found throughout South Dakota and are toxic to livestock.