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Dehydrating Food

two whole apples behind a small pile of dehydrated apple slices

Drying or dehydrating is one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Drying removes moisture from the food and slows enzyme activity. Dried foods take up less storage space and do not require refrigeration.

All Dehydrating Food Content

Mother with child cooking homemade jam in a kitchen.

Preservation Station!

At the end of this lesson, participants will be able to list the most-common methods used to preserve fruits or vegetables.

A variety of fresh fruits and vegetables displayed on a countertop.

Pick it! Try it! Like it! Preserve it!

Pick it! Try it! Like it! Preserve it! materials are filled with tips for selecting, preparing, and preserving a wide variety of fruits and vegetables.

a variety of bright colored fruits and vegetables arranged on a table

A Guide to Drying Foods

Fact sheet about drying foods

Preservation

SDSU Extension provides established and trusted research-based food preservation information.

two whole apples behind a small pile of dehydrated apple slices

Dehydrating Apples

A food dehydrator is a good choice for drying apples and can be used at any time. It is a small appliance that has an electric element for heat with a fan and vents for air circulation.