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Beef Herd Health and Quality Assurance

All Beef Herd Health and Quality Assurance Content

A stock pond with noticable blue-green algae bloom throughout.

Blue-Green Algae and Livestock

With warmer temperatures, the conditions are right for blue-green algae blooms. Different species of blue-green algae contain various toxins, which can poison livestock, resulting in rapid death.

A brown and black cow standing in a feedlot with flies on its face.

Summer Fly Control in Feedlots

Just as longer days mark the beginning of summer, so does the arrival of increased number of flies in feedlots. Flies are not only are an annoyance, they can reduce performance and worsen heat stress. Successful control strategies start with sanitation.

A black angus cow with yellow tags hanging from its ears.

Mineral Consumption: It Matters!

Cattle mineral nutrition is complex and often confusing, but one strategy to help ranchers better evaluate their mineral program is to monitor mineral consumption.

A field of flowering alfalfa.

Precautions for Grazing Weevil-Infested Alfalfa

Alfalfa weevil populations are high this year, creating challenges for producers. Questions have arisen on how to get some value out of the forage by grazing it rather than putting it up for hay.

A rancher inspecting the water quality of a small stock pond.

How Do Sulfates in Water Affect Livestock Health?

Poor-quality water will cause an animal to drink less. As a result, they also consume less forage and feed, which leads to weight loss, decreased milk production and lower fertility.

A stock pond with algae blooms developing throughout.

How Important Is Water Quality to Livestock?

Water is the most important nutrient to all livestock animals and is sometimes overlooked. Poor quality water can have a negative effect on growth, reproduction, and general productivity of the animal.

cattle grazing early spring pasture

Grass Tetany: Now Is the Time to Prepare

With warmer temperatures and significant soil moisture, ranchers need to be proactive in mitigating grass tetany risk. Cool season grasses are beginning to green up, posing a risk for cows with young calves.

Outside entrance to a large-animal veterinary clinic.

COVID-19 and Livestock: Is there a connection?

When reports of the COVID-19 pandemic first hit the US, very few people had likely heard of coronaviruses—with some notable exceptions: cattle producers and their veterinarians.

A teardrop shaped tan tick with eight legs and brown markings on a white background.

Winter Ticks in South Dakota

Winter ticks, also called moose ticks, are unlike other tick species because they are active during the winter months.

A steer standing in a feedlot. Its middle back has a visible bald spot due to lice.

Winter Lice Control

Seeing cattle rubbing hair off due to lice infestations can be extremely frustrating. Not only are the cattle damaging fences and equipment, there also can be performance losses and health issues not to mention that the cattle are simply not as visibly appealing, which can be very important for seedstock producers or feeders selling backgrounded feeders.