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Aging Well

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Aging is an important process that we all experience. While achieving older age may include some challenges, aging well is an obtainable goal. This is not to suggest that a person will not experience chronic disease or disability. However, tips and tricks are available to reduce the risk of developing disease or disability and improve overall quality of life, even when faced with significant challenges or loss. 

What is aging well? 

A key component of aging well is to delay or prevent the onset of chronic disease and disability. This is achieved through a variety of activities and behaviors shown to improve physical and psychological health and wellness outcomes. 

The fundamentals of aging well

Aging well is the product of physical, emotional/mental, social, intellectual, vocational/occupational, spiritual, environmental, and financial wellness. If one of these wellness areas is neglected, then wellness in other areas is likely effected.

  • Physical wellness is enhanced by incorporating movement in our daily lived, eating nutritious foods, and getting the recommended amount of sleep. 
  • Emotional/mental wellness requires us to cope with the stress and challenges of daily life.
  • Social wellness is acquired through our sense of connection and belonging to a well-developed support system.
  • Intellectual wellness emerges from our creative activities and drive to expand knowledge and skills.
  • Vocational/occupational wellness results from the satisfaction and enrichment from work, whether volunteer or paid employment.
  • Spiritual wellness refers to how an individual finds meaning and purpose in life. 
  • Environment wellness is the result of occupying a pleasant home and community that provide sufficient stimulation and support.
  • Financial wellness occurs when an individual is satisfied with current and future financial situations.

It may seem overwhelming to know where to begin for your personal journey to aging well. SDSU Extension is here to help. We have a variety of educational content and programs to help you create your own aging well plan. 

Reference

Wellness wheel and assessment
 

All Aging Well Content

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Brain Health: The Impact of Chronic Stress

Stress affects everyone. Stress is your body’s response to a real or perceived harmful situation.

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Brain Health: Sleep & Mental Rest

Reflect upon a time in which you did not sleep well and had difficulties paying attention the next day. Adequate sleep puts us in the right state-of-mind to absorb information throughout the day.

Assorted medical equipment for at-home diabetes testing and care.

Diabetes and COVID-19

If you are at higher risk of contracting COVID-19, it is important to take actions to reduce your chance of getting sick. Those at higher risk, including older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease, are encouraged to get ready now!

A blanket, book and cup of hot tea arranged on a sofa.

Self-Care for Youth and Families

Self-care is so essential for all individuals, young and old, to partake in regularly. Often, self-care gets placed on the back burners during our regular daily lives with our vast, jam-packed schedules. We get so wrapped up in our go-go-go routines and forget to take time for ourselves until we absolutely need it to continue onward.

Group of men playing a board game outside.

Is Your Home Aging-In-Place Ready?

February 27, 2020

SDSU Extension and NDSU Extension will be hosting a free webinar entitled “How to stay in your home longer.”

Aging in Place, Aging Well

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Group Seeks to Stop Falls Among Older Adults in South Dakota

February 11, 2020

Between 2007 and 2016, South Dakota was ranked fifth in the nation for death from falls among adults ages 65 and older. Beyond the risk of death, a fall can have a significant impact on individuals, families, and communities.

Health, Aging Well

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Fall Prevention

Falling is not a normal part of growing older. View this collection of tips, programs and resources to help reduce the risk of falling for yourself or a loved one.

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SDSU Extension Encourages Families To Discuss Aging

February 21, 2020

As you think about yourself as an older person, what do you see? The answer to this question is likely very personal because everyone has different goals and priorities for themselves and their family, explained Leacey E. Brown, SDSU Extension Gerontology Field Specialist.

Family Caregiving, Aging Well

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Older Adults

Over the next 20 years, the number of adults over the age of 65 will increase dramatically.

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5 Myths About Aging

Growing older is one of the few universal experiences. If we’re lucky, we will all experience what it is like to earn a couple wrinkles on our faces and watch our hair gray or have it fall out of our head.