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Drought: Livestock

All Drought: Livestock Content

an image of outdoor weather monitoring equipment in a field

Climate and Weather

View resources to predict, prepare and recover from weather-related events year-round, including the latest drought and flood information.

Three producers discussing a grazing plan in a pasture.

Five Range Management Principles: Creating a Grazing Plan

Creating a grazing management plan can be overwhelming. Learn the basic steps for outlining a plan, along with several resources to help identify the right strategy for your operation.

Color-coded map of the United States showing precipitation outlook for May 2022. The majority of South Dakota is predicted to have above-average precipitation.

May 2022 Drought and Climate Outlook

The May climate outlook favors cooler and wetter than average conditions. It is possible producers could experience some short-term drought relief, with a return to drought or re-intensifying in the mid-summer season.

Group of farmers and ranchers attending a drought meeting.

SDSU Extension to Host Drought Management Meetings

April 29, 2022

SDSU Extension will host drought management meetings across South Dakota May 10-12.

Color-coded drought monitor map of South Dakota. As of March 29, northwest to southeast South Dakota are facing severe drought to abnormally dry conditions, while the northeast is under normal conditions.

Drought

Stay ahead of drought impacts with SDSU Extension's timely climate updates, business insights and research-tested management tips.

Producers surveying a rangeland site.

Five Range Management Principles: Adaptive Management

Adaptive management is a process that livestock producers can incorporate into their operation to increase operation flexibility and adjust to changing conditions.

A herd of cattle grazing near a pond on an open range.

Ranch Drought Planning

Fact sheet with general drought planning tips from the range and natural resource perspective.

Lone sheep grazing drought-stressed rangeland.

Drought Considerations for Grazing Range Flocks

Having a drought plan in place to best manage pastures is critical in being prepared for next year’s grazing season. Make decisions that will manage risk and promote both flock and financial longevity.

From left: Meadow deathcamas in a South Dakota prairie rangeland. Silvery Lupine in a rangeland in South Dakota.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Deathcamas and Lupine

With prolonged drought conditions throughout many areas of South Dakota, there is an increase of invasive weeds and poisonous plants on rangelands. Identification of poisonous plants is crucial to ensure livestock production is not compromised.

Two poisonous rangeland plants. Left: Woolly Locoweed.  Right: Lambert Crazyweed (Purple Locoweed).

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Locoweed and Crazyweed

Locoweed and crazyweed are found throughout South Dakota rangelands, and both can cause livestock poisoning.The names locoweed and crazyweed are often used interchangeably. However, there are notable differences between the species.