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Drought: Crops

All Drought: Crops Content

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Climate and Weather

View resources to predict, prepare and recover from weather-related events year-round, including the latest drought and flood information.

Color-coded map of the United States showing precipitation outlook for May 2022. The majority of South Dakota is predicted to have above-average precipitation.

May 2022 Drought and Climate Outlook

The May climate outlook favors cooler and wetter than average conditions. It is possible producers could experience some short-term drought relief, with a return to drought or re-intensifying in the mid-summer season.

Group of farmers and ranchers attending a drought meeting.

SDSU Extension to Host Drought Management Meetings

April 29, 2022

SDSU Extension will host drought management meetings across South Dakota May 10-12.

A small black bug with tan margins on its wings resting on a grass seed head.

Black Grass Bugs May Cause Issues if Drought Persists

In western South Dakota, black grass bugs are a common spring forage pest that can cause considerable damage during periods of drought. Learn how to monitor and manage this pest to protect your forages this spring.

Map of South Dakota with green (zero to three grasshoppers), orange (four to seven grasshoppers), and red (8 or more grasshoppers) dots indicating grasshopper populations that were sampled in 2021. The north central region, west of the Missouri River, has the highest concentration of red and orange dots.

South Dakota Grasshopper Prediction for 2022

Data from the 2021 USDA Adult Grasshopper Survey of South Dakota suggests that grasshopper populations may continue to be problem in parts of central and western South Dakota during the spring of 2022.

Color-coded drought monitor map of South Dakota. As of March 29, northwest to southeast South Dakota are facing severe drought to abnormally dry conditions, while the northeast is under normal conditions.

Drought

Stay ahead of drought impacts with SDSU Extension's timely climate updates, business insights and research-tested management tips.

Color-coded drought monitor map of South Dakota. As of March 22, northwest to southeast South Dakota are facing severe drought to abnormally dry conditions, while the northeast is under normal conditions.

Agronomic Considerations for Moisture Deficit Conditions

The current soil moisture stress in South Dakota could be more pronounced than we have seen in last few years. If this continues, cropping decisions may need to be adjusted for the upcoming growing season.

A wheat field that is bright yellow due to infection of Wheat streak mosaic virus.

Pre-Plant Wheat Streak Mosaic Disease Management Strategies

Drought conditions tend to promote high wheat curl mite populations. Wheat streak mosaic virus and other viruses transmitted by wheat curl mites are best managed through cultural practices performed before planting.

A portion of a soybean field with soybean plants maturing with the soybean leaves turning yellow with the leaves and stems drying down.  The plants in the middle of the picture were also found with charcoal rot.

Charcoal and Fusarium Rots Observed in Early Senescing Soybean Plants

The drought conditions in South Dakota have led to early soybean senescence in some areas. However, some of the early senescing may be due to dry-season diseases, such as charcoal and Fusarium rots.

A soybean plant with wilting leaves due to stem canker surrounded by healthy soybean plants.

Stem Canker Developing in Some Soybean Fields

A few soybean fields are showing some wilting plants due to stem canker. The field entries and head rows are the most-impacted parts of these fields. The current dry conditions are stressing the plants and causing early development of the disease.