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Content by Russ Daly

Entrance to the Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Laboratory at South Dakota State University.

How Would Veterinary Diagnostic Labs Test for African Swine Fever?

What would African Swine Fever testing look like through the lens of our veterinary diagnostic laboratories? Interestingly, we know exactly what it looks like, because it’s already being done at sites such as the Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Laboratory at South Dakota State University.

An ear of corn in a field with visible white mold on the tip of the ear.

Can Livestock Utilize Moldy Grain?

While livestock producers know that moldy grain and forage are not ideal feedstuffs, they also know that stored feed occasionally contains a small amount of visible mold, and that their animals consume it with no obvious adverse effects. The question arises, how much mold is too much for a feed to be unsuitable for animals?

Outside entrance to a large-animal veterinary clinic.

COVID-19 and Livestock: Is there a connection?

When reports of the COVID-19 pandemic first hit the US, very few people had likely heard of coronaviruses—with some notable exceptions: cattle producers and their veterinarians.

A dog in the cab of a pickup truck as rain falls.

Preparing to Keep Pets Safe and Healthy During Flood Conditions

As is the case with providing for the care of livestock and other large animals during flooding, a little forward planning for the care of pets can really pay off when considering the disruptions that spring flooding can bring.

small group of cattle on a small piece of dry land surrounded by flood waters. FEMA News Photo

Spring Flooding: Preserving Your Ability to Care for Your Animals

When winter snowfall begins to melt, severe spring flooding can be a real possibility. Of the people witnessing the rising water, livestock producers and other animal caretakers have perhaps the most daunting task.

A close shot of a black and red cow's face. A blurred white cow's head is in the foreground.

Testing Your Beef Cattle for Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) is among the most important pathogens affecting today’s beef and dairy cattle operations. Associated with reproductive, digestive, and respiratory illnesses in cattle, the virus can also create a congenital, persistent infection in calves, greatly aiding the virus’ spread within and between herds.

A brown cow and a black calf standing in a muddy, water-soaked feedlot.

Notes From the ADRDL: Yersinia Infections Taking Advantage of Beef Cattle

Of all the germs associated with cattle illnesses during the challenging summer and fall, a pathogen that’s not one of the usual suspects has been identified in several cases of cattle death losses in Eastern South Dakota.

female veterinarian standing in front of a small group of black cows

South Dakota One Health Efforts Look at Antibiotic Use and Other Connections Between Animals and People

November 04, 2019

South Dakota One Health is a collaborative effort that promotes a deeper understanding of the connections between the health of people, animals and the environment.

A large swine barn at the edge of a field.

Pork Producers and the One Health Movement: Actions at the State Level

The term “One Health” has been coined to describe the concept that the health of people, animals and their environment are inextricably linked. The most commonly considered examples of One Health in practice are zoonotic diseases. For pork producers, influenza strains that originate in pigs, but pass to people are a pertinent example.

Oat plants exhibiting crown rust symptoms.

Does Crown Rust in Oats Cause Problems for Livestock?

The weather conditions during the spring and summer of 2019 contributed to many challenges for farmers and livestock producers. For crop producers, one of those issues is crown rust in oats. The abundance of this crop disease has raised questions for livestock producers.