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Field Pea

All Field Pea Content

aerial view of South Dakota farm and surrounding land

Pest & Crop Newsletter

SDSU Extension publishes the South Dakota Pest & Crop Newsletter to provide growers, producers, crop consultants, and others involved in crop production with timely news pertinent to management of pests, diseases, and weeds in South Dakota.

A green tractor pulling a fertilizer wagon through a field of alfalfa.

Fertilizing Forages in South Dakota

Spring is a busy time for South Dakota farmers and ranchers with planting, calving, and other field preparations. Soil sampling and fertilizing pastures, alfalfa, or other forages might be overlooked.

A stand of field peas mixed with small grains being grown for forage.

Peas Offer Options in 2020

Current events have made decisions around crop options very difficult this spring. Field peas are an option that may have a fit for some producers.

United States Environmental Protection Agency logo.

Cancellation of Several Neonicotinoids

On May 20, 2019, the United States Environmental Protection Agency announced the cancellation of registrations for 12 products that contain neonicotinoid insecticides. The cancellation of the product registrations was voluntarily requested by the companies that had registered the products.

A green pea leaf with white, powdery spots throughout.

Powdery Mildew: A Disease Concern in Field Peas

Producers of field peas may need to scout for powdery mildew this year. Powdery mildew is a late-season fungal disease that can impact peas if weather conditions are conducive. However, this disease can also occur in early planted fields in South Dakota under the right environmental conditions and when the crop canopy is heavy.

Alfalfa green field

2017 Weed Control: Pulse Crops

Weed competition can cause significant yield reduction in pulse crops. Pulse crops are weak competitors with weeds, therefore planning an effective weed control program is one of the keys to profitable production.

A collage of farmers from different time periods sharing information.

Effecting Change Towards Economic Growth

During 2018 the main driver for South Dakota's economic growth continued to be agriculture. It is still the number one industry, with almost $20 billion in impact yearly. In today’s uncertain economic environment, two things can help farmers succeed: information and knowledge.

Soybean plants with wilting, cupped leaves as the result of dicamba herbicide damage.

South Dakota Herbicide Damage

As the spray season starts, it is always good to be aware of resources and testing facilities where you can send in possible herbicide-affected plant samples. SDSU Extension offers suggestions on how to handle possible herbicide damage situations as well as recommended labs that receive plant matter samples to test for herbicide residues.

a variety of cover crops growing in a field

Herbicide Considerations for Cover Crop Planting in 2019

Long residual pre-emergent or early post-emergent herbicides may cause stand reduction or complete failure of cover crops. Depending on efficacy of the herbicide, each situation can both affect in-season and/or post-harvest cover crop establishment.

Field with field peas and blue sky with fluffy white clouds

An identification guide of common Diseases of Dry Peas in South Dakota

A guide depicting common diseases of Dry Peas in South Dakota