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aerial view of South Dakota farm and surrounding land

Pest & Crop Newsletter

SDSU Extension publishes the South Dakota Pest & Crop Newsletter to provide growers, producers, crop consultants, and others involved in crop production with timely news pertinent to management of pests, diseases, and weeds in South Dakota.

A tall, grassy, warm-season cover crop blend grown in Central South Dakota.

Dakota Lakes Research Farm Fall Field Day to be Held Sept. 18

September 13, 2019

South Dakota State University’s Dakota Lakes Research Farm will host a fall field day on Sept. 18 at 10 a.m. CDT. The farm is located at 21310 308th Ave., Pierre, S.D. 57501, and is approximately 17 miles east of Pierre on Hwy 34.

Corn, Cover Crops, Beef Cattle, Dairy Cattle

Three South Dakota fields that claimed prevent plant. The first field is planted with a cover crop. The second field has no cover crops, but tillage was completed to control weeds. The third has no cover crops and weeds are growing throughout.

Prevent Plant: Its Effect on Fall and Spring Fertilizing Plans

Driving around South Dakota, you can see the many acres that farmers were not able to plant. Now that fall soil-sampling season is well on its way, many people have questions regarding how different situations of prevented planting will affect soil sampling and fertilizer application needs.

Green blades of rye growing amongst brown corn stalks.

Cereal Rye Cover Crop Between Corn and Soybean

Interest in cover crops has increased in recent times. Cereal rye has been a cover crop of choice among corn and soybean growers in South Dakota due to its superior tolerance to cold temperatures and ability to overwinter in a Northern climate.

Cover crops planted in a harvested oat field.

Cover Crops After Small Grains

In last few years, interest in using cover crops has been increasing tremendously among crop and livestock producers in South Dakota. Growing cover crops following small grain is gaining more attention due to feasibility in cover crops species selection and also the time of the year where cover crops receive longer growing and establishing time than following row crops.

A green cut alfalfa field dries as the sun sets.

Forage Resources Available to S.D. Farmers and Ranchers

Forages are a very important part of the South Dakota livestock and cropping industries. Often, producers have difficulties finding enough forage for their herd or locating a fellow producer to buy, sell or rent forages and grazing acres too. South Dakota now has two widely-recognized, free resources to aid in these connections.

A sprayer applying pre-emergent pesticide to a bare field.

Herbicide Rotation Restrictions

This is a quick reference guide to common herbicides and their rotation restrictions for selected crops.

Two groups of cover crops. Left: Oats. Right: Radish.

Herbicide Interactions With Cover Crops After Oats

After oats have been harvested, options exist to keep a living root in the soil. This can be done through growing cover crops. In 2018 an on-farm trial was preformed near Salem, South Dakota to observe how cover crops grown after oats would germinate after common herbicides had been applied.

Three color-coded maps indicating no-till, conservation tillage, and conventional tillage percentages in South Dakota. For a complete description, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.

Soil Conservation Practice Adoption Status at the S.D. County Level: 2012–2017

An increasing number of farmers across the state of South Dakota have adopted different soil conservation practices such as no-till, conservation tillage and cover crops. Over time, these practices play significant roles in improving soil health and increasing soil resilience towards extreme weather conditions.