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Community Garden

All Community Garden Content

A pair of hands transplanting a tomato seedling in a black, plastic pot.

Promoting Safe Community Gardening Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

May 05, 2020

SDSU Extension experts have established guidelines for community gardens to follow in order to promote the health and safety of local gardeners during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A pair of hands transplanting a tomato seedling in a black, plastic pot.

Growing Your Own Food

Are you thinking about growing your own fresh vegetables this year, maybe for the first time? In addition to the satisfaction of providing fresh, nutritious and delicious produce for yourself and family or friends, many find working with plants and soil to be a great antidote for the worries and frustrations of the day.

A flooded garden

Flooded Gardens

Soil from gardens that were recently flooded may not be safe for growing fruit and vegetables this summer. Depending on the location, flood waters may contain contaminants or disease-causing organisms.

an image of a yellow and orange flower

Community Gardens: Types of Plants

A community garden will have to determine if they allow perennial growing plants or if they only allow annuals. Perennials can be great additions, as people enjoy growing and eating asparagus, strawberries, raspberries, tree fruit and others.

a wooden sign for a community garden

Community Gardens: Lease Agreements

Once the location of your community garden has been determined, it is suggested that you draft a lease agreement outlining the expectations and responsibilities of the community garden group and the landlord.

an image of a fenced in garden

Community Gardens: Garden Rules

It is necessary to have a clear set of rules or guidelines established for community garden participants. Every garden and community is different, so local organizers will want to establish rules that work best for their program. When developing your garden’s rules or guidelines include a range of perspectives, from the leadership team to the landowner to the gardeners.

produce growing in a collection of raised beds in a SDSU Extension community garden

Community Gardens

Community gardens, organized by SDSU Extension staff and community volunteers, bring fresh produce to many rural communities and designated food desserts across the state.

A collage of various plant diseases. Courtesy: USDA (iStock)

Plant and Weed Resources

Consult these resources for answers to common plant and weed issues, including: plant characteristics, plant problems (diseases, insects, and abiotic), plant selection and management, and weed identification and control.

A group of three people pruning a tree.

Garden Clubs & Associations

Novice gardeners and master gardeners share a love of and respect for nature, which is one of the many reasons why they naturally seek out like-minded individuals to organize clubs or associations.

The La Montanita Co-op Veteran Farm Project (VFP) in Albuquerque, NM.

Training Gardens and Business Incubators

Community gardens are associated with urban areas and food production. However, community gardens can also be used as job training sites or small business incubators.