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Animal Health

All Animal Health Content

Barn damaged by a windstorm.

Tetanus: A Storm Aftermath Problem for Animals

Of all the challenges faced by animal caretakers in the wake of damaging storms, Tetanus is a potentially serious disease that might not appear for days or weeks later. Learn some expert tips for recognizing, treating and preventing it.

Veterinarian using a digital tablet in a sheep barn.

Clostridial Disease Management and Vaccines for Sheep and Goats

Vaccination against clostridium perfringens is universally recommended for small ruminants. Learn some expert vaccine considerations for both sheep and goats.

Red angus cattle gathered in a feedlot in winter.

Livestock

South Dakota is home to a dynamic livestock industry.

SDSU off-site wean-to-finish production barn.

Feed Additives Can Modulate the Swine Gut Microbiome in Weaned Pigs

Recent research at the SDSU Commercial Wean-to-Finish Research Facility found that a combination of feed additives provided benefits to the performance of weaned pigs and also modulated the swine gut microbiome.

From left: Meadow deathcamas in a South Dakota prairie rangeland. Silvery Lupine in a rangeland in South Dakota.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Deathcamas and Lupine

With prolonged drought conditions throughout many areas of South Dakota, there is an increase of invasive weeds and poisonous plants on rangelands. Identification of poisonous plants is crucial to ensure livestock production is not compromised.

Low larkspur and twogrooved poisonvetch plants growing in rangeland.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Larkspur and Poisonvetch

Larkspurs are the second leading cause for all livestock deaths from toxic plant poisoning. Poisonvetches are considered accumulator plants that uptake excessive levels of selenium and cause toxicity problems in cattle.

Two poisonous rangeland plants. Left: Woolly Locoweed.  Right: Lambert Crazyweed (Purple Locoweed).

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Locoweed and Crazyweed

Locoweed and crazyweed are found throughout South Dakota rangelands, and both can cause livestock poisoning.The names locoweed and crazyweed are often used interchangeably. However, there are notable differences between the species.

Three poisonous rangeland plants. From left: Hemlock, Halogeton and Buffalo Bur.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Hemlock, Halogeton and Buffalo Bur

Several species of poisonous plants are invasive and can easily establish dense stands when there is a disturbance on rangelands. Hemlocks, halogeton and buffalo bur can all be found throughout South Dakota and are toxic to livestock.

Three woody plants. From left: Ponderosa pine tree, chokecherry bush and greasewood.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Woody Species

Several woody plant species that are poisonous to livestock are found throughout South Dakota rangelands, including ponderosa pine, chokecherry, greasewood and broom snakeweed.

SDSU’s off-site wean-to-finish barn.

Phytobiotics-based Product Found to Impact Bacterial Populations in Gut of Weaned Pigs

As additions to feed or water, phytobiotics have shown promise in alleviating some of the negative effects of weaning on piglet health and growth performance.