Skip to main content

Gentle Yoga

Updated March 17, 2020
Thumbnail

Nikki Prosch

SDSU Extension Health & Physical Activity Field Specialist

Yoga

The practice of yoga uses postures, breath work, and meditation to bring balance to the mind and body. There are many styles of yoga with each of them having benefits of their own. Finding a style of yoga that works for you is an important part of establishing your own practice. Gentle yoga uses physical postures that are accessible to most people and that are done at a slower pace while being held for longer.

Benefits

Gentle yoga is accessible to most and promotes mobility of the muscles and joints through strength, flexibility and relaxation. It encourages mindfulness that can be applied to your everyday life. Practicing gentle yoga will work to decrease your stress and anxiety and promote a clear and balanced mind.

How to Practice

You can practice at home by following the postures below in the sequence they are in or pick a few of them that you may need the most. Hold the postures for 30 seconds to 2 minutes depending on how you feel. End by taking a few deep breaths.

A young woman demonstrating the easy seat and seated twist yoga poses. For a complete description of the movements, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.
A young woman demonstrating the starting and finishing position for the seated cow-cat and eagle arms yoga poses. For a complete description of the movements, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.
A young woman demonstrating the cow and cat yoga poses. For a complete description of the movements, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.
A young woman demonstrating the starting and finishing position for the balancing table and knee to elbow yoga poses. For a complete description of the movements, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.
A young woman demonstrating the down dog and low lunge yoga poses. For a complete description of the movements, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.
A young woman demonstrating the hamstring stretch and forward fold yoga poses. For a complete description of the movements, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.
A young woman demonstrating the child's pose and reclined butterfly yoga poses. For a complete description of the movements, call SDSU Extension at 605-688-6729.

Related Terms

Physical Activity, Health