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Content by Connie Strunk

Green cover crop growing within yellow wheat stubble.

Cover Crop Considerations When Dealing With Soybean Cyst Nematode

With the soybeans being harvested a little earlier than usual this year, some producers are finding themselves making management decisions that include cover crops. For soybean producers dealing with soybean cyst nematode in their fields, selection of cover crops is important since some of these can be hosts for soybean cyst nematode.

Harvested corn field with field pennycress throughout.

Soybean Cyst Nematode Management Plans Should Include Proactive Weed Management

While soybean cyst nematode can be managed through use of resistant varieties and crop rotation, presence of alternative weed hosts can negate the benefits of these practices by providing a host for soybean cyst nematode to continue to accumulate in the soil.

Left: A corn ear showing Gibberella ear rot symptoms. Right: A prematurely dried corn stalk split to reveal pith disintegration due to stalk rot.

Corn Ear Rots and Stalk Rots: The Last Issues To Check for in Corn Before Combining

Before combining corn, it is recommended to scout your field for corn ear rots and stalk rots. It is important to scout corn fields for these two issues in order to make timely decisions on corn combining.

Male and female rancher reviewing clipboard in a cattle barn.

COVID-19 Tips for Farms and Ranches

Continuing to keep employees and family members healthy through the COVID-19 pandemic will require extra effort as you enter the busy time of fall harvest.

A map of South Dakota counties shaded to indicate the year for which the soybean cyst nematode was detected.

HG Type Testing: A Management Strategy for Soybean Cyst Nematode Control

Have you noticed lower soybean yielding areas in your field? Soybean cyst nematode may be to blame. Fall, and especially after soybean harvest, is the best time to sample soil and have it tested for soybean cyst nematode.

A soybean field showing plants in a circular pattern killed charcoal rot.

Scout for Charcoal Rot in Early Senescing Parts of the Field

The drought conditions in the past few weeks have led to some soybean fields senescing early. However, some of the early senescing may be due charcoal rot.

A soybean field with plants yellowing and dropping leaves in larger portion of the field while the rest of the field has green soybean plants.

Drought Stress or Stem Canker Killing Soybean Plants?

Several soybean fields scouted in a number of Eastern counties have plants dying or dropping leaves prematurely. While the majority of these fields have drought stress causing early senescence, a few fields have also stem canker developing

: Golden colored wheat field with much taller, golden colored, volunteer rye within.

Volunteer Winter Rye Could Be a Source of Ergot in Your Wheat

A few wheat fields scouted this summer were found with volunteer rye infested with ergot. Volunteer rye, in addition to being a weed, can be a source of ergot, which is a concern for winter wheat producers.

Soybean plant with with yellow-chlorotic blotches between leaf veins and noticable browning due to sudden death syndrome.

Sudden Death Syndrome of Soybean

Fact sheet discussing sudden death syndrome of soybean.

Small white cylindrical mites on a wheat leaf.

Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus is Prevented Before Planting Winter Wheat

Wheat streak mosaic disease (WSMD) is one of the important diseases in winter wheat and can lead to severe yield losses.