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A color-coded map of the united states indicating temperature outlook for August 2019. South Dakota is mostly covered in blue.

August 2019 Climate Outlook: Cool and Wet

According to the latest climate outlook update, odds are favoring that August 2019 will be cooler than average. The update was released by NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center on July 31, 2019.

A color-coded map of the United Statees showing the precipitation outlook for August through October 2019. All of South Dakota is light green. Parts of Western South Dakota are a darker green.

Wet Conditions Likely Into Fall Season

Many locations in South Dakota have already received as much precipitation this year as they do in an entire average year. The latest climate outlook from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center shows increased chances of wetter than average conditions to continue into the fall season.

Shiny black beetle on a white background.

Black Vine Weevils Becoming Active

Black vine weevils are now showing up across the state. It is typical for the adult beetles to emerge in early summer and begin feeding on plant foliage. They primarily feed on lilacs and yews, both common landscape shrubs. Although the adults cause minimal damage, their larvae feed on the roots and can occasionally be a threat to ornamental plants, especially those grown in pots or containers.

Top view of a black colored ant inside of a clear plastic container.

Watch Out For Carpenter Ants

With the continued moisture and warmer temperatures, carpenter ants have become a more common appearance in South Dakota. Similar to termites, this insect can be a structural pest, causing damage to homes and other buildings. It is important to identify and treat carpenter ants early to prevent any potential damage.

Color-coded map of the United States indicating predicted precipitation for July 2019. South Dakota is set to experience above normal precipitation.

July 2019 Climate Outlook: Challenges Continue

This year’s seasonal pattern of wetter than average conditions is projected to continue through July and the rest of the summer season. The latest climate outlook, released June 20, 2019, shows an increased chance of wetter than average conditions in the next one to three months for the state of South Dakota.

A color-coded map of the United States indicating precipitation outlook for June 2019.

June 2019 Climate Outlook for South Dakota

As South Dakota emerges from the wettest 12-month period in 124 years of climate recordkeeping (June 2018-May 2019), June has started warmer and drier than average. The outlook, however, turns towards cooler and wetter than average again for the middle of the month.

Map of United States with green areas favored to be wetter than average and tan areas favored to be drier than average.

May 2019 Climate Outlook: April Showers Bring May Showers?

The precipitation outlook for May does not show much promise of relief from moisture, as wetter than average conditions are slightly more favored than drier conditions. In addition, cooler than average temperatures are more likely for the first half of May and could continue for much of the month.

a photo of emerald ash borer larva

Emerald Ash Borer Homeowner and Commercial Workshops

April 15, 2019

SDSU Extension, the City of Sioux Falls, South Dakota Department of Agriculture and the South Dakota Arborist Association have teamed up to provide homeowners and commercial applicators with Emerald Ash Borer information. The workshops will be led by City of Sioux Falls' employees Duane Stall, Forestry Supervisor, Bryan Peterson, Urban Forestry Specialist, Bret Winterfeld, GIS Specialist and John Ball, SDSU Extension Forestry Specialist & South Dakota Department of Agriculture Forest Health Specialist.

Trees, Garden & Yard Issues

Black hairy caterpillar with a dark brown band in the middle of its body. The caterpillar is crawling on grey cement with visible pebbles present in the substrate.

Are those woolly bear caterpillars I see crawling?

Anyone that spent the weekend outdoors may have observed flies, wasps, bees, and others flying around for the first time this year. One of these insects is a familiar one, the woolly bear caterpillar.