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Equipment Safety

All Equipment Safety Content

A green combine that has caught fire in the field.

Avoiding Field Fires During Fall Harvest

With dry and drought conditions in the late summer and fall, crops dry down rapidly and harvest starts early. The climate outlook may be favorable for an uninterrupted run at harvest. However, the risk of fires during harvest is always a concern for farmers.

A manure pit at a dairy farm.

Putting Manure Handling Safety Into Practice

As livestock producers, we should know the dangers of manure pit gases. As safety equipment improves with advancements in technology, we must provide training on proper manure handling safety protocols and the use of equipment.

Grain storage bin.

Steps to Prevent Stored Grain Infestations

As wheat harvest is underway it is important to ensure that grain bins are prepared in the best possible manner to prevent insect infestations. There are seven steps that can be taken to help reduce the chances of having infested grain.

Three John Deere Tractors moving silage and packing the corn silage to make a drive over silage pile.

Be Safe and Smart Around Silage

Corn silage making season will soon be upon us. It is important to take the time to communicate with employees proper protocols while making silage, along with safe practices around silage piles or silos.

Country road with a thunderstorm approaching in the distance.

Summer Severe Weather Safety

Hail, high winds, heavy rain, lightning, tornadoes. These weather phenomena are common during South Dakota summers. Stormy weather can be beautiful to see, especially in our evening skies, but it can also be dangerous or life-threatening.

A young man receiving an optometry examination.

Keep an Eye on Your Dairy Farm Employee Vision Health

With the aim to understand more about vision impairment with dairy employees, the SDSU Extension dairy team researched dairy employees' health status with a focus on vision care.

A red, round hay baler that has been burned up from a fire.

Preventing an Unwanted Baler Fire

Forage harvesting for hay will soon be upon us, and we need to take the time to prepare our equipment and ourselves for a safe and successful forage harvest when utilizing a baler.

Female dairy employee operating a skid-steer carrying a load of feed in the bucket.

Skid-Steer Safety: Are You and Your Employees Practicing It?

One piece of machinery used daily on many farms, especially dairies and acreages, is a skid-steer. Owners and employees need to be aware of the correct operating procedures for this equipment and make sure that all who are operating the skid-steer have had adequate training in its operation.

a black and yellow respirator mask with blue protective gloves in the background.

Wearing a Respirator? Then No Facial Hair for You!

At commercial or private applicator re-certification trainings, it is possible to hear the phrase, “Don’t wear a respirator if you have facial hair!” Facial hair, whether a full beard or stubble, may prevent respirators from sealing to the skin or interfere with their valve function.

Rain shower over a field with several hay bales throughout. Courtesy: Krista Lundgren, USFWS

Fire Hazard in Wet Bales

Baled stored hay can get wet during spring as a result of melting snow or rainwater. These bales are also more susceptible to heating as they constitute and ideal substrate for microorganisms.