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Wildlife

All Wildlife Content

A teardrop shaped tan tick with eight legs and brown markings on a white background.

Winter Ticks in South Dakota

Winter ticks, also called moose ticks, are unlike other tick species because they are active during the winter months.

grass with field bindweed, a viny green weed with white flowers

Weed Control: Noxious Weeds

Noxious Weed Recommendations: Herbicides for pasture, range, and non-crop areas, including roadside and other right-of-way that may be harvested for hay or grazed, are given a priority.

a black tailed prairie dog resting on a mount

Prairie Dog Management in South Dakota

Prairie dogs are an important component of the grassland ecosystem. They feed on grasses and forbs, as well as seeds and some insects. They can consume large amounts of vegetation. This is a problem for livestock producers as they compete with livestock for forage.

A herd of cattle grazing near a stock pond.

2019 Eastern South Dakota Water Conference to be Held Oct. 16 at South Dakota State University

October 01, 2019

The 2019 Eastern South Dakota Water Conference will be held Oct. 16 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the campus of South Dakota State University in the Volstorff Ballroom of the University Student Union.

Conservation, Grassland, Soil Health, Wildlife

an image of outdoor weather monitoring equipment in a field

SD Mesonet, SD Wheat partner to Bring Weather Station to West River Research Farm, Sturgis

May 22, 2019

The South Dakota Mesonet has installed a new weather station at the West River Research Farm near Sturgis with the support of the South Dakota Wheat Commission.

Beef Cattle, Sheep, Corn, Soybean, Wheat, Cover Crops, Forage, Field Pea, Flax, Oats, Oilseed, Pulse Crops, Sorghum, Sunflower, Dairy Cattle, Dairy Goats, Goats, Horse, Poultry, Rabbit, Swine, Pasture, Range, Grassland, Soil Health, Wildlife, Developing Communities

Tick that is dark brown to black in color with a reddish-orange abdomen.

Protecting Yourself From Ticks

During wet springs, tick populations tend to thrive in South Dakota. These parasitic arthropods require blood to fulfill their nutritional needs and commonly use humans as a host. Some ticks can also carry bacterial diseases that are a threat to human health.

grass with field bindweed, a viny green weed with white flowers

2018 Weed Control Noxious Weeds

Noxious Weed Recommendations: Herbicides for pasture, range, and non-crop areas, including roadside and other right-of-way that may be harvested for hay or grazed, are given a priority.

white-tailed buck standing in a clearing with snow on the ground

Natural Resources & Conservation

South Dakota is home to many unique land, water and wildlife resources. Our experts and partners offer research-based information through to help people enjoy, preserve and profit from these natural resources.