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Wildlife

All Wildlife Content

Ringneck pheasant nestled in winter rangeland.

Natural Resources & Conservation

South Dakota is home to many unique land, water and wildlife resources. Our experts and partners offer research-based information through to help people enjoy, preserve and profit from these natural resources.

Group of Rangeland and Soils Day competitors observing grassland conditions during the competiton.

Judging South Dakota Rangelands for Livestock and Wildlife Values

Guide for judging South Dakota rangelands for livestock and wildlife values

Group of black cattle near a stock dam that’s drying up under drought conditions.

Drought Planning

A drought plan will be an essential component to your overall grazing plan, as it provides guidance in making decisions during critical times when forage may be lacking.

grass with field bindweed, a viny green weed with white flowers

Weed Control: Noxious Weeds

Noxious Weed Recommendations: Herbicides for pasture, range, and non-crop areas, including roadside and other right-of-way that may be harvested for hay or grazed, are given a priority.

Smooth bromegrass growing in an open grassland.

Introduced Grasses and Forbs

While native grasslands contribute greatly to the integrity of the overall grassland community in South Dakota, the use of introduced grasses has proven a popular alternative for some producers.

herd of beef cattle grazing in a pasture

Structuring Grazing Leases

Fact sheet including ranch resource goals to improve landowner - lessee relationships.

black cow drinking from a nearly empty stock pond.

Feed & Water Testing Laboratories

A partial listing of available feed testing laboratories.

A group of white tail deer in a snowy clearing.

Give the Gift of Conservation This Christmas

The SDSU Natural Resources Management Department and SDSU Extension would like to wish all our readers a Merry Christmas and remind everyone that if you are shopping for a late holiday gift, consider giving the gift of conservation to yourself or someone else.

Wildlife and the Bottom Line

As the fall harvest wraps up and this year’s calf crop is weaned, many producers may be nervous about what their paychecks will look like for 2016. In tough market conditions, it can be tempting to try to squeeze just a bit more production out of the land.

A green front-end-loader pulling a hay mower with a flushing bar.

Haying With Wildlife in Mind

Anyone who has spent time cutting hay knows that hayland can be a magnet for wildlife in late spring and early summer. Hay fields are often considered an “ecological trap” for wildlife; that is, they appear to be high quality habitat for nesting or feeding due to tall, dense grass and legumes, but often lead to increased mortality once harvesting is under way.