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Planting Wheat

All Planting Wheat Content

aerial view of South Dakota farm and surrounding land

Crops

During the growing season, SDSU Extension provides weekly production recommendations.

A wheat field at sunset.

Water Use by Plant Stage

Over the growing season, solar radiation, air temperature and plant size are the dominant factors in determining evaporative demand and the rate of water use by wheat. Water use can vary dramatically on a day-to day basis, depending on climate and wheat health.

Benefits of Wheat in a Corn Soybean Rotation

Crop rotation has long been recognized as a standard component of integrated pest management in cropping systems.

A sprawling, planted field with young crops emerging

Crop Rotation in Farm Management 

Crop rotation has long been considered an important farm practice. In 2013 producers had to stray from their well thought out crop rotations when the winter wheat crop in South Dakota failed.

bare field in spring waiting to be planted

Planting Considerations for a Late Spring

Farm fields in some areas are unusually wet this year with many low areas under water. These conditions will make planting a challenge for farmers this year.

A corn field in South Dakota looking very wet due to flooding from spring rains and melted snow.

Delayed Planting Challenges: Cover Crop Considerations

High waters and saturated soils across many counties in South Dakota have producers worried about getting their crops planted in a timely manner this spring. In many areas, typical cash crops will not be a possibility. Producers may need to develop alternative plans.

A grass forage blend grows in a central SD field as Red cattle graze.

Delayed Planting Challenges: Alternative Forages

With the excessively wet planting conditions much of South Dakota is now experiencing, many producers are looking for “Plan B” to meet forage needs for their livestock, or as a commodity that can be marketed to livestock producers.

A field of green winter wheat.

Planning for Quality in Wheat

Excess moisture and limited field days have made it difficult for producers to add nitrogen to wheat fields this year. This could be a concern, as nitrogen contributes to both yield and protein. This year, it may pay off to take tissue and soil tests from questionable wheat fields to help with nitrogen application decisions.

Weeds growing in a recently harvested winter wheat field.

Winter Wheat Decisions

Winter wheat planting will soon be starting and a number of decisions will have to be made for a successful winter wheat crop, including: the time of planting, the choice of variety to be planted, disease and pest management decisions and crop insurance.

Green and yellow grasshopper with black chevron markings on hindlegs.

Should I Be Concerned About Grasshoppers When Planting Winter Wheat?

During 2019 we have received varying reports regarding grasshopper populations. Many reports have indicated that grasshopper numbers are down. However, we have also received reports of very large grasshopper populations in some areas of South Dakota. So why such a difference?