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Forage

All Forage Content

Cover crops growing in a field of harvested corn.

Utilizing Cover Crops for Grazing: An Assessment on Economic Benefits

Grazing cover crops by cattle provides an option to offset cover crop seed costs and increase farm revenue. To facilitate farmers’ decision making, this article will evaluate the economic profitability from grazing cattle on cover crops using a partial budgeting approach.

A man inspecting a field with salty soil.

Perennial Solutions for Alkali Areas

Reclaiming marginal lands, especially those considered saline or sodic can be very challenging and may take many years to accomplish. The key to turning around salt or alkali areas in your fields, begins with getting a living root established in the affected area.

Two side-by-side fields. The left field is planted with perennial grass. The right field is bare with salty soil exposed.

Managing Weeds While Transforming Marginal Land Into Perennial Forages Production

There are currently millions acres across South Dakota impacted by saline and sodic conditions. Research has shown that salt-tolerant perennial grasses are a possible way to bring land back into production.

cattle grazing early spring pasture

Grass Tetany: Now Is the Time to Prepare

With warmer temperatures and significant soil moisture, ranchers need to be proactive in mitigating grass tetany risk. Cool season grasses are beginning to green up, posing a risk for cows with young calves.

A group of mixed cattle grazing in a pasture with several Canada Thistle plants spreading throughout.

Alternative Pasture Weed Control

The term ‘weed’ can be broadly applied to any plant that is undesirable at any given time and place based on certain criteria. It is important to understand that the word ‘weed’ has become a general term with no universal definition, and many plants are considered to be weeds, depending on location.

aerial view of South Dakota farm and surrounding land

Pest & Crop Newsletter

SDSU Extension publishes the South Dakota Pest & Crop Newsletter to provide growers, producers, crop consultants, and others involved in crop production with timely news pertinent to management of pests, diseases, and weeds in South Dakota.

A male producer removing net wrap from an upright bale.

Net Wrap Removal Made Easy

I was approached by a cattle producer about efficiently removing net wrap. As many of you know, net wrap has its advantages as well as disadvantages, but is largely used as a hay binding material.

hay bales lined up in a spring field

Resources and Options When Feed is Short

SDSU Extension offers resources to help producers find and evaluate feedstuffs to help meet their livestock’s needs.

Pieces of net wrap and forage wadded up together, with a nob approximately 6 inches across at the top and 4 inches long, with a 1 inch rope like structure that is 13 inches long leading to another nob that is approximately 2 inches across and 8 inches long.

Summary of Forage Binding Survey and Current Net Wrap Research

Recently, cattle producers and veterinarians have become more concerned with the possible ingestion of net wrap or twine from hay bales and the negative impacts it could have on cattle health and performance.

Sunny field with large puffy clouds and blue sky

2020 South Dakota Pest Management Guides Released

January 24, 2020

The 2020 South Dakota Pest Management Guides are now available for free on the SDSU Extension website.

Oilseed, Corn, Wheat, Soybean, Sunflower, Crop Management, Crop Treatments, Forage