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Forage

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aerial view of South Dakota farm and surrounding land

Pest & Crop Newsletter

SDSU Extension publishes the South Dakota Pest & Crop Newsletter to provide growers, producers, crop consultants, and others involved in crop production with timely news pertinent to management of pests, diseases, and weeds in South Dakota.

A green cover crop mixture grows on a calm day; mainly consisting of oats and peas.

Buying or Selling Oats for a Cover Crop?

July 11, 2019

As a challenging row crop planting season finally wraps up for 2019 in South Dakota, many producers are looking to plant cover crops on unplanted acres to provide forage, control weeds, reduce erosion and improve soil health. One popular cool-season grass cover crop is oats. Most oats in South Dakota are grown as certified varieties and it is important to be aware of the legal ramifications behind purchasing oat seed for use as a cover crop.

Oats, Cover Crops, Forage, Crop Management

A tall, grassy, warm-season cover crop blend grown in Central South Dakota.

Cover Crops 2019 - What to Plant When

July 10, 2019

As many Midwest producers look to cover crops to build soil health and/or provide supplemental forage after a soggy spring, many questions are arising regarding management decisions, specifically species selection and planting timing.

Cover Crops, Forage, Crop Management

A tall, grassy, warm-season cover crop blend grown in Central South Dakota.

Cover Crops 2019: What to Plant When

As many Midwest producers look to cover crops to build soil health and provide supplemental forage after a soggy spring, many questions are arising regarding management decisions, specifically, species selection and planting timing.

A green cover crop mixture grows on a calm day; mainly consisting of oats and peas.

Buying or Selling Oats for a Cover Crop? Be Sure to Follow the Rules

As a challenging 2019 row crop planting season wraps up in South Dakota, many producers are looking to plant cover crops on unplanted acres. One popular cool-season grass cover crop is oats. Most oats in South Dakota are grown as certified varieties, and it is important to be aware of the legal ramifications behind purchasing oat seed for use as a cover crop.

Lush, green hay growing in a ditch alongside an oil road.

Ditch Hay: Harvesting, Quality, and Feeding

Using ditch hay to feed cattle is a common practice across the U.S. It provides livestock producers with a source of readily available forage, which can be very useful, particularly during feed shortages.

healthy rangeland with a diverse variety of grasses and plants throughout

SDSU Extension Hosts 2019 Forage Field Day in Beresford August 7

June 24, 2019

August 7, 2019 SDSU Extension will host a Forage Field Day for livestock producers, agronomists and industry clientele interested in producing and storing high quality forages.

Forage, Crop Management, Beef Cattle, Dairy Cattle, Corn, Wheat, Field Pea, Flax, Oats, Oilseed, Pulse Crops, Sorghum, Soybean, Sunflower

Color-coded map of the United States indicating predicted precipitation for July 2019. South Dakota is set to experience above normal precipitation.

July 2019 Climate Outlook: Challenges Continue

This year’s seasonal pattern of wetter than average conditions is projected to continue through July and the rest of the summer season. The latest climate outlook, released June 20, 2019, shows an increased chance of wetter than average conditions in the next one to three months for the state of South Dakota.

Black caterpillars with white stripes feeding on green Canada thistle.

Thistle Caterpillars Showing Up on Canada Thistle

This week we received reports of caterpillars feeding on Canada thistle. After taking a look at the caterpillars, we determined that they are thistle caterpillars. However, we typically don’t see thistle caterpillar activity in S.D. until July or August. So why are they showing up so early this year?

United States Environmental Protection Agency logo.

Cancellation of Several Neonicotinoids

On May 20, 2019, the United States Environmental Protection Agency announced the cancellation of registrations for 12 products that contain neonicotinoid insecticides. The cancellation of the product registrations was voluntarily requested by the companies that had registered the products.