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Weeds & Invasive Plants

All Weeds & Invasive Plants Content

Four common spring weeds: Shepherd’s Purse, Catchweed Bedstraw, Waterpod and Henbit.

Spring Annual Weeds

There are several weeds that pop up very early in the spring and start flowering before most other plants have shown any signs of growth. Learn about some common varieties to look out for.

A group of raised ground beds with crops growing in them at McCrory Gardens in Brookings, South Dakota.

SDSU Extension to Host Garden Hour Webinars

April 27, 2022

SDSU Extension horticulture specialists will address the latest gardening and landscaping questions from across the state during the Garden Hour webinar series every Tuesday at 7 p.m. CDT from May 3 through Aug. 30.

From left: Meadow deathcamas in a South Dakota prairie rangeland. Silvery Lupine in a rangeland in South Dakota.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Deathcamas and Lupine

With prolonged drought conditions throughout many areas of South Dakota, there is an increase of invasive weeds and poisonous plants on rangelands. Identification of poisonous plants is crucial to ensure livestock production is not compromised.

Low larkspur and twogrooved poisonvetch plants growing in rangeland.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Larkspur and Poisonvetch

Larkspurs are the second leading cause for all livestock deaths from toxic plant poisoning. Poisonvetches are considered accumulator plants that uptake excessive levels of selenium and cause toxicity problems in cattle.

Two poisonous rangeland plants. Left: Woolly Locoweed.  Right: Lambert Crazyweed (Purple Locoweed).

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Locoweed and Crazyweed

Locoweed and crazyweed are found throughout South Dakota rangelands, and both can cause livestock poisoning.The names locoweed and crazyweed are often used interchangeably. However, there are notable differences between the species.

Three poisonous rangeland plants. From left: Hemlock, Halogeton and Buffalo Bur.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Hemlock, Halogeton and Buffalo Bur

Several species of poisonous plants are invasive and can easily establish dense stands when there is a disturbance on rangelands. Hemlocks, halogeton and buffalo bur can all be found throughout South Dakota and are toxic to livestock.

Three woody plants. From left: Ponderosa pine tree, chokecherry bush and greasewood.

Poisonous Plants on Rangelands: Woody Species

Several woody plant species that are poisonous to livestock are found throughout South Dakota rangelands, including ponderosa pine, chokecherry, greasewood and broom snakeweed.

A small pile of harvested non-gmo soybeans on a grey cloth.

Want a Premium Price? Weed Control In NON-GMO Soybeans

Many emotions set in on farmers that hear the word “non-GMO”, but it could help them in times like today when prices are low for many farm products in South Dakota.

An organic garden with flowers, plants, land vegetables growing.

Organic Herbicides

Many gardeners across the state of South Dakota desire to have weed-free gardens, yards and flowerbeds. Many homeowners do not want to use inorganic herbicides due to their potential health effects.

Small group of cattle eating plants near a fenceline

Cows Eat Weeds

By utilizing grazing as a means of cultural control, producers have the potential to decrease input expenses while reaping the benefits of inexpensive weed control through animal nutrition.