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Jason Clark

Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Soil Fertility Specialist

605-688-4395

Berg Agricultural Hall 310
Agronomy, Horticulture & Plant Science-Box 2207A
University Station
Brookings, SD 57007

Soil fertility guidelines for South Dakota cropping systems

Also by Jason Clark

Three South Dakota fields that claimed prevent plant. The first field is planted with a cover crop. The second field has no cover crops, but tillage was completed to control weeds. The third has no cover crops and weeds are growing throughout.

Prevent Plant: Its Effect on Fall and Spring Fertilizing Plans

Driving around South Dakota, you can see the many acres that farmers were not able to plant. Now that fall soil-sampling season is well on its way, many people have questions regarding how different situations of prevented planting will affect soil sampling and fertilizer application needs.

A group of black heifer calves in a feedlot.

Using Feedlot Manure as a Crop Nutrient Source

Factsheet that reviews the steps to obtain a manure application rate based on crop need, soil and manure testing.

Spring wheat growing in a no-till field. Courtesy: USDA NRCS South Dakota, (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Chloride Fertilizers May Be Beneficial in Spring Wheat Production

Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, although not considered an essential nutrient, has long been observed to be highly beneficial to field crops. Chloride is known to play an essential role in plant development and osmoregulation.