Skip to main content

Content by Jason Clark

Three South Dakota fields that claimed prevent plant. The first field is planted with a cover crop. The second field has no cover crops, but tillage was completed to control weeds. The third has no cover crops and weeds are growing throughout.

Prevent Plant: Its Effect on Fall and Spring Fertilizing Plans

Driving around South Dakota, you can see the many acres that farmers were not able to plant. Now that fall soil-sampling season is well on its way, many people have questions regarding how different situations of prevented planting will affect soil sampling and fertilizer application needs.

A group of black heifer calves in a feedlot.

Using Feedlot Manure as a Crop Nutrient Source

Factsheet that reviews the steps to obtain a manure application rate based on crop need, soil and manure testing.

Spring wheat growing in a no-till field. Courtesy: USDA NRCS South Dakota, (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Chloride Fertilizers May Be Beneficial in Spring Wheat Production

Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, although not considered an essential nutrient, has long been observed to be highly beneficial to field crops. Chloride is known to play an essential role in plant development and osmoregulation.

A green tractor, pulling a red, high-clearance planter through a field of emerging corn.

Interseeding Cover Crops Effect on Corn and Soybean Production: 2019

Incorporating cover crops into our cropping systems and moving from conventional tillage to no-till can improve soil organic matter, soil structure, and water and nutrient holding capacity of our soils.

man holding a small pile of soil in his hands

Recommended Soil Sampling Methods and Instructions

Proper collection of soil samples is extremely important as the accuracy of the soil test depends on the quality of the soil sample provided to the lab.

man holding a small pile of soil in his hands

SDSU Extension Seeks Grower Input for South Dakota Nutrient Management Survey

SDSU Extension, the South Dakota Nutrient Research and Education Council and the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station at SDSU are interested in learning more about the nutrient management practices you use on your farm through a survey.

Young winter wheat plants with light yellowish green leaves, a symptom of nutrient deficiency.

SDSU Extension Seeks Grower Input for South Dakota Nutrient Management Survey

June 12, 2019

SDSU Extension, the South Dakota Nutrient Research and Education Council and the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station at SDSU are interested in learning more about the nutrient management practices you use on your farm through a survey.

an image of the cover of the SDSU Extension Fertilizer Recommendations Guide

SDSU Extension Releases 2019 Fertilizer Recommendations Guide

April 08, 2019

SDSU Extension recently released the online Fertilizer Recommendations Guide, available at extension.sdstate.edu/fertilizer-recommendation-guide.

crop fields flooded by spring snow melt. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung

Managing Soil and Soil Fertility After Flooding

During floods, your fields will experience different amounts of erosion, sediment deposition, and crop residue accumulation. To avoid compaction of these soils it is crucial to let soils drain and dry out sufficiently before removing any large debris from fields or working the soil.

man holding a small pile of soil in his hands

Fertilizer Recommendation Guide

SDSU Extension fertilizer recommendations are based on field research in South Dakota and neighboring states.