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Connie Strunk

SDSU Extension Plant Pathology Field Specialist

605-782-3290

SDSU Extension Sioux Falls Regional Center
4101 W 38th St Ste 103
Sioux Falls, SD 57106

Connie supports the citizens of South Dakota in her role as the SDSU Extension Plant Pathology Field Specialist based in Sioux Falls.

Also by Connie Strunk

Green cover crop growing within yellow wheat stubble.

Cover Crop Considerations When Dealing With Soybean Cyst Nematode

With the soybeans being harvested a little earlier than usual this year, some producers are finding themselves making management decisions that include cover crops. For soybean producers dealing with soybean cyst nematode in their fields, selection of cover crops is important since some of these can be hosts for soybean cyst nematode.

Harvested corn field with field pennycress throughout.

Soybean Cyst Nematode Management Plans Should Include Proactive Weed Management

While soybean cyst nematode can be managed through use of resistant varieties and crop rotation, presence of alternative weed hosts can negate the benefits of these practices by providing a host for soybean cyst nematode to continue to accumulate in the soil.

Left: A corn ear showing Gibberella ear rot symptoms. Right: A prematurely dried corn stalk split to reveal pith disintegration due to stalk rot.

Corn Ear Rots and Stalk Rots: The Last Issues To Check for in Corn Before Combining

Before combining corn, it is recommended to scout your field for corn ear rots and stalk rots. It is important to scout corn fields for these two issues in order to make timely decisions on corn combining.