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Harvesting Corn

All Harvesting Corn Content

Sunset over two grain bins in a field.

Inspecting Grain Bins After a Windstorm

Due to their high profile and light structure, metal grain bins are highly susceptible to wind damage. View a step-by-step guide for inspecting them in the aftermath of a windstorm.

aerial view of South Dakota farm and surrounding land

Crops

During the growing season, SDSU Extension provides weekly production recommendations.

corn field with sunrise in the background

Corn

Nearly one out of every three dollars generated by South Dakota agriculture starts in a corn field. Two of every three rows of corn become ethanol.

Grain bin damaged by a windstorm.

Salvaging Feed Grain From Damaged Storage Structures

The windstorm that hit South Dakota on May 12, 2022 left an extensive damage in its wake, including damage to grain bin structures. Taking prompt action can help minimize value loss in stored grain.

A John Deere Max Emerge XP corn planter behind a Case IH Magnum 335 with AFS precision farming system.

Why Precision Agriculture?

When precision agriculture comes into a conversation a few questions arise. Three of those questions might be: What is precision agriculture? How does precision agriculture make our farm more profitable? What do I do with all this data?

harvester chopping corn silage, depositing silage into green wagon.

Herbicide Residual Effects on Cover Crops after Corn Silage

Fact sheet about herbicide residual effect on cover crops after corn silage.

Three corn cobs with common ear rots. From left: Fusarium ear rot, Gibberella ear and Diplodia ear rot.

Scout for Corn Ear Rots

Several corn fields scouted in northeastern South Dakota counties were found with ear rots. Ear rots were mostly prevalent in areas that experienced hailstorms in the recent past. Ear rots in corn are caused by a few fungal pathogens, and which ear rot develops depends on the weather conditions.

Left: A corn ear showing Gibberella ear rot symptoms. Right: A prematurely dried corn stalk split to reveal pith disintegration due to stalk rot.

Corn Ear Rots and Stalk Rots: The Last Issues To Check for in Corn Before Combining

Before combining corn, it is recommended to scout your field for corn ear rots and stalk rots. It is important to scout corn fields for these two issues in order to make timely decisions on corn combining.

Gibberella ear rot and Fusarium spp. symptoms on two corn ears.

Gibberella and Fusarium Ear Rots Developing in Corn

Corn ear rots are one of the last diseases to scout for in the corn growing season, and sometimes they are ignored or forgotten entirely. Ear rots can cause yield loss in the form of grain quality at harvest, but also cause losses during storage.

An empty grain bin full-air floor is plugged by insect webbing.

Stored Grain Pests: Spring Insect and Disease Issues

Grain storage is a key component in getting your crop to market. Aside from watching bins for spoilage, moisture, and temperature changes, make sure you are looking for signs of pest infestation.