Skip to main content

Flood Resources for Homeowners, Individuals & Families

Use this information for your family and home during and after a flood.

All Flood Resources for Homeowners, Individuals & Families Content

A map of the Big Sioux River Basin.

Big Sioux River Flood Information System Sees Heavy Use During Spring 2019

The Big Sioux River Flood Information System is the result of a combined effort between the SD Department of Environment and Natural Resources, local governments, and private industry, to create a product that can be used to predict the impact of flood events in the Big Sioux River Basin.

A glass of water beneath a kitchen faucet tap.

Is Your Water Safe to Drink?

Consuming water in some way, shape, or form is essential for survival. Staying adequately hydrated gives your body the balance it needs to continue throughout the day. During a flood or other natural disasters, the circumstances can become more difficult to find safe water to drink.

diagram of a conventional septic system

Septic Systems and Flooding

Septic systems may not always be a homeowner’s first concern during a flood. However, as South Dakotans continue to navigate an exceptionally wet spring, some consideration should be given to your septic system to prevent damage to your home and protect your family’s health.

A flooded garden

Flooded Gardens

Soil from gardens that were recently flooded may not be safe for growing fruit and vegetables this summer. Depending on the location, flood waters may contain contaminants or disease-causing organisms.

A hand writing on a financial document with a pen.

Keeping Your Financial Records Secure

When a family emergency or disaster occurs, having quick access to important financial documents is essential.

Flooded farm yard. Photo by John Shea, FEMA.

Checking and Treating Domestic Water Supplies After a Flood

Depending on its location, domestic well water supplies can oftentimes be negatively impacted during a flood.

Outside of a home impacted by flooding. Sandbags ar in front of windows and the garage. Photo by David Valdez, FEMA

Cleanup in Your Home: After the Flood

When faced with disaster, one may not know where to begin or what to do when cleaning out our homes and businesses following a flood. To get started with this task, SDSU Extension has put together a list of resources to help start cleaning flood damages, personal belongings, and mold and mildew issues.

A family emergency kit in a gray plastic tote. Photo by Zachary Kittrie

Flood Safety Considerations for Youth

Much like any event or disaster, the time to prepare for a flood is before it happens. Families should prepare for events by having a conversation with family members.

A car being towed a flooded, washed out gravel road by a national guard truck. Photo by Senior Master Sgt. David H. Lipp, U.S. Department of Defense

Floodwater: Road Crossing Hazards

During flooding, and when driving in the countryside we oftentimes encounter a creek or stream running on top of the road. Be aware that a course of water running over the road can turn into a very dangerous, even life-threatening situation if you attempt to cross it with your vehicle.

Map of South Dakota with colored dots indicating river stage levels.

Where to Find Weather and River Forecasts

Weather and flooding concerns can develop and change rapidly. There are some excellent resources for real-time information for weather forecasts and river flooding that can be accessed online.