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Emmanuel Byamukama

Associate Professor & SDSU Extension Plant Pathologist

605-688-4521

Plant Science Building 107
Agronomy, Horticulture & Plant Science-Box 2108
University Station
Brookings, SD 57007

Generate research-based information to help growers manage plant diseases effectively and sustainably.
Provide alerts and updates of diseases developing in crops
Help growers diagnose plant diseases affecting their field crops
Provide fungicide safety and resistance management education

Also by Emmanuel Byamukama

A wheat field that is bright yellow due to infection of Wheat streak mosaic virus.

Wheat Streak Mosaic of Wheat

Fact sheet about symptoms, disease cycle, risk factors and management of Wheat streak mosaic disease

Three corn cobs with common ear rots. From left: Fusarium ear rot, Gibberella ear and Diplodia ear rot.

Scout for Corn Ear Rots

Several corn fields scouted in northeastern South Dakota counties were found with ear rots. Ear rots were mostly prevalent in areas that experienced hailstorms in the recent past. Ear rots in corn are caused by a few fungal pathogens, and which ear rot develops depends on the weather conditions.

A portion of a soybean field with soybean plants maturing with the soybean leaves turning yellow with the leaves and stems drying down.  The plants in the middle of the picture were also found with charcoal rot.

Charcoal and Fusarium Rots Observed in Early Senescing Soybean Plants

The drought conditions in South Dakota have led to early soybean senescence in some areas. However, some of the early senescing may be due to dry-season diseases, such as charcoal and Fusarium rots.