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Crop Treatments

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A wet, unplanted field with water pooling and running off into a ditch.

Is Herbicide Carryover a Concern in Wet Weather

June 04, 2019

For many South Dakota farmers, wet conditions have forced the need to change planting plans. In some cases, crops are being planted in areas that were not planned for that crop this year. One factor in the moving of crops that should not be overlooked is carryover, explained Paul Johnson, SDSU Extension Weed Science Coordinator.

Crop Management, Crop Treatments, Corn, Soybean, Wheat, Flood

A wet, unplanted field with water pooling and running off into a ditch.

Is Herbicide Carryover a Concern in Wet Weather?

Wet conditions have forced the need to change planting plans. In some cases, crops are planted in areas that were not planned for that crop this year. One factor in moving crops that cannot be overlooked is carryover. Does the ground to be planted have a carryover restriction for the desired crop to be planted?

Teardrop shaped green insect with long legs and antennae on a lighter green leaf.

Scouting for Pea Aphids in Alfalfa

One of the insects that should be monitored for in alfalfa during the spring and early summer are pea aphids. Although we haven’t spotted any yet in 2019, the presence of pea aphids in alfalfa is common.

Alfalfa shoots with top leaves showing yellow patches interspersed with green patches, symptoms for Alfalfa mosaic virus

Alfalfa Mosaic Developing in a Few Alfalfa Fields

In South Dakota, alfalfa fields that were recently scouted were found to be infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) at a very low incidence. AMV is a common virus in alfalfa that can also infect soybeans.

Soybean plants with wilting, cupped leaves as the result of dicamba herbicide damage.

South Dakota Herbicide Damage

As the spray season starts, it is always good to be aware of resources and testing facilities where you can send in possible herbicide-affected plant samples. SDSU Extension offers suggestions on how to handle possible herbicide damage situations as well as recommended labs that receive plant matter samples to test for herbicide residues.

Blades of green wheat in a wheat field.
Jul 16

2019 West River Field School

SDSU Extension will host West River Field School on July 16, 2019 starting at 8:15 AM MDT at the SDSU West River Research Farm (13304 Alkali Rd., Sturgis, SD 57785).

Soil Fertility, Cover Crops, Corn, Forage, Field Pea, Flax, Oats, Oilseed, Pulse Crops, Sorghum, Soybean, Sunflower, Wheat, Crop Management, Crop Treatments, Agricultural Land Value, Range, Conservation, Soil Health, Chemical Safety

a black and yellow respirator mask with blue protective gloves in the background.

Wearing a Respirator? Then No Facial Hair for You!

At commercial or private applicator re-certification trainings, it is possible to hear the phrase, “Don’t wear a respirator if you have facial hair!” Facial hair, whether a full beard or stubble, may prevent respirators from sealing to the skin or interfere with their valve function.

Winter wheat blades with lesions with a dark brown center and yellow margin surrounding the lesion.

Diagnosing Early Diseases in Winter Wheat

Winter wheat progress is relatively behind the five-year average given the long winter season and low spring temperatures. However, it is important to scout and diagnose early-season diseases in winter wheat to determine the need for an early season fungicide.

Purple-brown caterpillar with orange head on a green corn leaf.

How to Identify Common Stalk Borers and Thresholds

As corn is being planted, it is important to remember that there are insect pests capable of injuring young, vegetative corn. One such pest is the common stalk borer. Although common stalk borer outbreaks are sporadic, when present in high numbers they can cause significant yield loss.