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Content by Pete Bauman

Flowering Canada thistle distributing seed in a pasture.

Dense Seeding Can Reduce Canada Thistle in Planted Grasslands

Canada thistle is a common invader in grassland plantings. Over the past decade, researchers and land managers have experimented with controlling Canada thistle in planted grasslands through increasing competition from desirable plants.

Grassland with a large amount of dried brush and fuel for burning.

Removing Young Trees From Grasslands Will Save Money and Effort

Volunteer trees can hinder the development of desirable wildlife habitat and livestock resources. Early control of volunteer woody species is the simplest and most cost-effective option for maintaining open grassland habitats.

A patty of dung with several holes in it and grass growing through it. It has been broken down by dung beetles.

Dung Beetles and Other Insects Can Help Breakdown Dung and Control Pests

This article summarizes findings related to dung beetle ecology and how dung beetles advance the breakdown of dung pats.

herd of beef cattle grazing in a pasture

Structuring Grazing Leases

Fact sheet including ranch resource goals to improve landowner - lessee relationships.

A black angus cow walking through pasture being followed by two calves.

Lessons From Alternative Calving Workshops

Recently, the South Dakota Grassland Coalition and SDSU Extension held workshops across the State focused on sharing information from experienced livestock producers who have switched to a calving date more in sync with nature.

a map of South Dakota's grasslands.

SDSU Extension Receives National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Award for South Dakota Native Habitats Study

April 17, 2020

An SDSU Extension native habitats research project recently received a National Fish and Wildlife Foundation award to support an ongoing effort to identify native habitats in South Dakota.

an image of a cow with two young calves in a green pasture

Alternative Calving Workshops to be Held in February throughout South Dakota

August 06, 2020

The South Dakota Grassland Coalition, in partnership with SDSU Extension and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, will host a series of workshops focused on alternative calving methods in February.

A red angus cow with two unweaned calves attempting to suckle from it.

Alternative Calving Considerations

Structuring a calving program that best suites farm and ranch operations can be challenging. Of primary concern are: weather, labor, market timing, and animal health considerations, with weather possibly being the most volatile factor, as it ranges from challenging to catastrophic in some years.

Small group of cattle eating plants near a fenceline

Cows Eat Weeds

By utilizing grazing as a means of cultural control, producers have the potential to decrease input expenses while reaping the benefits of inexpensive weed control through animal nutrition.

A black cow grazing on a public grassland.

Grazing & Recreation on South Dakota School & Public Lands

At a recent meeting of the South Dakota Grassland Coalition, Ryan Brunner Commissioner of State School and Public Lands, provided excellent information for those interested in understanding more about grazing and hunting on South Dakota School and Public Lands.