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Content by Jennifer Folliard

FDA Graphic: New Label/What's Different. For complete description call the FDA at 1-888-723-3366. Courtesy: FDA

The New Food Label: What’s new? What’s the same? When can we expect to see changes?

The Nutrition Facts Panel, commonly referred to as the food label, that we see on all packaged foods, will be updated on all food items by 2021.

A variety of bulk foods on display at a local pick-up center.

Buying in Bulk Can Be Healthy and Cost-Effective

Schools continue to provide food to children in a “grab-and-go” style due to COVID-19. Many schools are packing more than one meal for families to pick up. SDSU Extension has put together a chart of typical bulk purchased food items and how many servings can be expected in each serving.

Two school lunch workers assembling salads in a school kitchen.

Grab and Go Style Meal Service Resources for Schools

View meal ideas and an example 4-week meal plan.

A box filled with sack lunches available for children to take home.

Food Resources in Your Community: Schools and Organizations Mobilize to Provide Food as a Response to COVID-19

The USDA has approved the serving of food in South Dakota at school sites and non-congregate settings while public schools remain closed during the COVID-19 outbreak. Different communities throughout the state are using programs to provide meals to kids that may not have access to food while school is closed.

two heart-shaped bowls filled with mixed fruit

SDSU Extension Promotes Making Informed Food Choices for National Nutrition Month® 2020

March 13, 2020

As part of National Nutrition Month® 2020 in March, the SDSU Extension Food and Families Team encourages people to make informed food choices and develop healthy eating and physical activity habits.

Sign at a farmers market reading "we welcome SNAP benefits"

Electronic Purchases and SNAP

“SNAP” stands for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, a federal program administered by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) in collaboration with state agencies of Social Services or Children and Family Services.

A family planting vegetables in a raised bed garden.

Building Your Farm to School Team

One of the first steps to take when starting with farm to school is developing your farm to school team. Putting together a farm to school team should include a core group of individuals and agencies who are dedicated to the farm to school mission.

A variety of fresh, garden vegetables sitting on a wooden fence.

School Purchasing Guide and Menu Planning

Getting started with implementing farm to school can be challenging and can bring on many questions. A big question that many schools have is: Why local?

Two young girls enjoying healthy snacks after school. Courtesy: Bob Nichols, USDA [CC BY 2.0].

Child and Adult Care Food Program: The At-Risk After-School Snack and Meal Program Providing Nutrition and Enrichment After the School Day Is Over

The At-Risk Afterschool Meal Program is a part of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) that focuses on getting children a nutritious meal after the bell rings. For some, this may fill the gap that may occur from lunch that day until the next morning at breakfast.

people shopping at a farmer's market

Double Up Dakota Bucks

Double Up Dakota Bucks doubles the value of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as SNAP, benefits when used on fresh fruits and vegetables.