Skip to main content

Soybean

All Soybean Content

Tractor preparing a soybean field for planting at twilight.

Soybean Rolling: Yield Effects

Land rolling soybeans has become a common management practice in many areas of South Dakota. The main reason for using a land roller on soybean fields is to push down rocks and level the soil surface for harvest, in theory reducing the amount of rocks and other debris that can potentially damage a combine header.

Diagram showing increasing harvested acres of corn and soybeans and decreasing harvested acres of wheat in South Dakota. Other crops remain steady, while hay decreased and then slightly increased.

Crop Diversity Reduced in South Dakota

The recently released 2017 Census of Agriculture data shows that South Dakota has experienced a considerable increase in acreage harvested of two major crops, corn and soybeans over the past decade.

A wet, unplanted field with water pooling and running off into a ditch.

Is Herbicide Carryover a Concern in Wet Weather

June 04, 2019

For many South Dakota farmers, wet conditions have forced the need to change planting plans. In some cases, crops are being planted in areas that were not planned for that crop this year. One factor in the moving of crops that should not be overlooked is carryover, explained Paul Johnson, SDSU Extension Weed Science Coordinator.

Crop Management, Crop Treatments, Corn, Soybean, Wheat, Flood

sun rising over South Dakota field

SDSU Extension Ag Economics Dialogues Webinar Focus on the 2018 Farm Bill Commodity Safety Net Decisions & Market Outlook

June 04, 2019

SDSU Extension will host Ag Economics Dialogues Webinar, which will focus on the 2018 farm bill commodity safety net decisions and market outlook, June 14, 2019 from 10 a.m. to Noon (central). In addition to the webinar, the Ag Economics Dialogues will be held live in Sioux Falls at the SDSU Extension Regional Center (2001 E. 8th Street).

Markets/Prices, Corn, Field Pea, Flax, Oats, Oilseed, Pulse Crops, Sorghum, Soybean, Sunflower, Wheat, Economics

A wet, unplanted field with water pooling and running off into a ditch.

Is Herbicide Carryover a Concern in Wet Weather?

Wet conditions have forced the need to change planting plans. In some cases, crops are planted in areas that were not planned for that crop this year. One factor in moving crops that cannot be overlooked is carryover. Does the ground to be planted have a carryover restriction for the desired crop to be planted?

Soybean seed drill. Courtesy: United Soybean Board

Late Soybean Planting: Management Considerations

While saturated soil conditions are prevalent in many areas of the state, extended weather outlooks suggest that producers may be able to return to the fields and resume soybean plantings in the near future. Should management practices change due to the late planting season?

Small fly with black and white alternating bands on legs.

Soybean Gall Midge: It’s a New Species!

Researchers recently determined that the soybean gall midge, discovered in South Dakota in 2015, is actually a previously undocumented species. The origin of the new species, Resseliella maxima Gagné, is still unknown.

Alfalfa shoots with top leaves showing yellow patches interspersed with green patches, symptoms for Alfalfa mosaic virus

Alfalfa Mosaic Developing in a Few Alfalfa Fields

In South Dakota, alfalfa fields that were recently scouted were found to be infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) at a very low incidence. AMV is a common virus in alfalfa that can also infect soybeans.

A sprawling, planted field with young crops emerging

Are My Crops Susceptible to Chilling Injury?

To say that the spring of 2019 has been a challenge for South Dakota producers is an understatement. According to the USDA-NASS, corn and soybean planting progress in SD was pegged at 19% and 4% on May 20th, respectively, which is far below the 5-year averages of 76% and 39%. Last week was the first time much of either crop was planted in SD.