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School Nutrition

All School Nutrition Content

Group of students eating lunch at school

Farm to School

Farm to school provides an opportunity for youth in early childcare, educational settings, after-school programs and other settings to experience local foods.

Gardener planting a tomato transplant up to its first set of leaves.
Jan 18

Bringing the Farm to School: Producer Training @ Brookings

SDSU Extension along with its project partners will offer Bringing the Farm to School: Producer Training in Brookings, South Dakota January 18-19.

A woman rinsing vegetables off in an outdoor sink.
Feb 14

Bringing the Farm to School: Producer Training @ Rapid City

SDSU Extension along with its project partners will offer Bringing the Farm to School: Producer Training in Rapid City, South Dakota February 14-15.

Two young girls enjoying healthy snacks after school. Courtesy: Bob Nichols, USDA [CC BY 2.0].

Fueled for Fun!

This activity is appropriate for Pre-K-2nd grade (ages 4-7) and can be used by classrooms, small groups, or individuals.

Lunch room in a daycare facility with plates set on the tables and fall decorations in the background.

Importance of Proper Nutrition and Physical Activity in Early Childhood

Childcare outside the home is relatively common in the United States, as a majority of children ages two-to-five attend some type of childcare and spend roughly 30 hours per week in others care. Due to this, both parents and early childhood educators are responsible to ensure children are receiving the nutrition they need for proper childhood development.

Two school lunch workers assembling salads in a school kitchen.

Grab and Go Style Meal Service Resources for Schools

View meal ideas and an example 4-week meal plan.

A box filled with sack lunches available for children to take home.

Food Resources in Your Community: Schools and Organizations Mobilize to Provide Food as a Response to COVID-19

The USDA has approved the serving of food in South Dakota at school sites and non-congregate settings while public schools remain closed during the COVID-19 outbreak. Different communities throughout the state are using programs to provide meals to kids that may not have access to food while school is closed.

Two young girls enjoying healthy snacks after school. Courtesy: Bob Nichols, USDA [CC BY 2.0].

Child and Adult Care Food Program: The At-Risk After-School Snack and Meal Program Providing Nutrition and Enrichment After the School Day Is Over

The At-Risk Afterschool Meal Program is a part of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) that focuses on getting children a nutritious meal after the bell rings. For some, this may fill the gap that may occur from lunch that day until the next morning at breakfast.

A school lunch tray filled with a variety of healthy foods. Courtesy: Healthy Schools Campaign

National School Lunch Week: ‘Lettuce’ Celebrate!

National School Lunch Week is October 14–18, 2019. During National School Lunch Week, schools around the country celebrate all of the ways a school lunch can positively affect a child’s life, both at school and at home.

Group of young children receiving a free meal at a lunch station. Courtesy: USDA

Communities Around South Dakota Provide Summer Meals for All Children

This summer, communities across South Dakota will be serving free meals to children, to ensure good nutrition and growth. The USDA Summer Meals Programs works with the South Dakota Department of Education, Child and Adult Nutrition Services office to make sure that when school lets out children are well-nourished throughout the summer.