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Flood

SDSU Extension resources to prepare for and recover from flooding are listed below. Additional information is also available from the Department of Homeland Security’s FEMA , US Department of Agriculture, SD Department of Public Safety, National Weather Service, Environmental Protection AgencyCenters for Disease Control and Prevention and the South Dakota Department of Health.

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All Flood Content

A color-coded map of the United States indicating precipitation outlook for June 2019.

June 2019 Climate Outlook for South Dakota

As South Dakota emerges from the wettest 12-month period in 124 years of climate recordkeeping (June 2018-May 2019), June has started warmer and drier than average. The outlook, however, turns towards cooler and wetter than average again for the middle of the month.

Color-coded map of South Dakota and other Midwestern states. Colors indicate a higher risk of unplanted areas in Eastern and Northeastern South Dakota.

Stretching Corn Silage Supplies

During the 2002 drought there was a need to stretch corn silage supplies as a result of the drought that affected the U.S. Now we deal with the opposite scenario, where excessive spring rains have not allowed farmers to get to the fields. In both situations livestock producers face challenges.

A wet, unplanted field with water pooling and running off into a ditch.

Is Herbicide Carryover a Concern in Wet Weather

June 04, 2019

For many South Dakota farmers, wet conditions have forced the need to change planting plans. In some cases, crops are being planted in areas that were not planned for that crop this year. One factor in the moving of crops that should not be overlooked is carryover, explained Paul Johnson, SDSU Extension Weed Science Coordinator.

Crop Management, Crop Treatments, Corn, Soybean, Wheat, Flood

A wet, unplanted field with water pooling and running off into a ditch.

Is Herbicide Carryover a Concern in Wet Weather?

Wet conditions have forced the need to change planting plans. In some cases, crops are planted in areas that were not planned for that crop this year. One factor in moving crops that cannot be overlooked is carryover. Does the ground to be planted have a carryover restriction for the desired crop to be planted?

Microscope analyzing a slide.

How the Veterinary Lab Diagnoses Anthrax in a Beef Herd

Anthrax is a serious disease of cattle that pops up somewhere almost every year in South Dakota. It’s caused by a bacteria that survives as a very tough spore form in the soil. Knowing whether a death on pasture has been caused by anthrax is important for several reasons.

Group of red and black cattle eating silage from a feed bunk.

Delayed Planting Challenges: Late-Planted Corn and Cattle Feeding

With the challenges of getting crops planted this year many farmers are likely weighing their options and re-considering their planting intentions. For producers that can market feedstuffs through livestock (particularly cattle), it may be premature to completely abandon corn simply due to calendar dates.

A corn field in South Dakota looking very wet due to flooding from spring rains and melted snow.

Delayed Planting Challenges: Cover Crop Considerations

High waters and saturated soils across many counties in South Dakota have producers worried about getting their crops planted in a timely manner this spring. In many areas, typical cash crops will not be a possibility. Producers may need to develop alternative plans.

A grass forage blend grows in a central SD field as Red cattle graze.

Delayed Planting Challenges: Alternative Forages

With the excessively wet planting conditions much of South Dakota is now experiencing, many producers are looking for “Plan B” to meet forage needs for their livestock, or as a commodity that can be marketed to livestock producers.

South Dakota soybean late plant date map. View pdf map: https://legacy.rma.usda.gov/fields/mt_rso/2018/final/sdsoybeans.pdf  View text in Excel: https://legacy.rma.usda.gov/fields/mt_rso/2018/final/sdsoybeanstext.xlsx

Multi-Peril Crop Insurance: Delayed and Prevent Plant Choices

Crop insurance late plant dates are fast approaching for planting crops in South Dakota. The weather and soil conditions this spring will likely lead to some prevent plant situations for farm producers.

A newborn calf with its mother in a snowy field

Will Health Effects Linger in Beef Calves Following Harsh Spring Weather?

Beef herds calving in late winter or early spring flirt with disaster annually when it comes to bitter weather conditions. It’s a rare year when a prolonged cold snap or snowstorm doesn’t occur during this critical period. In the throes of those weather conditions, calf health and even survival can be directly affected.