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Early Childhood Education

All Early Childhood Education Content

SDSU Extension Early Childhood Field Specialist Audrey Rider reading a book to a group of four children.

Child Education

Nationally, more than 60 percent of households are dual income, resulting in an increased need for early childhood education programming.

A child’s crayon drawing of various pets.

Losing Pets and Talking About Death

As we are dealing with illnesses and diseases running through our animal population, it is important to discuss the loss of a pets with children. Learn some expert tips for starting the conversation.

A bowl of oatmeal topped with fresh fruit.

Fuel for Back to School

With children returning to school, it is vital that they start the day off with a nutrient-dense meal to promote proper growth and health.

variety of fresh vegetables in basket

Family Fun With Gardening

Gardening is a fun way to incorporate physical activity into your day, and is a great way to connect kids to where their food comes from!

Three young girls weighing sugar on a kitchen scale.

Children Can Learn Math and Science in the Kitchen

Now is a great time to help your child learn and understand math and science while having a fun time. The kitchen is the perfect classroom.

School lunch staff serving trays of healthy food a group of children.

Benefits of Farm to School and Early Care and Education

Farm to school (F2S) programs have potential to create substantial positive impacts on an array of F2S stakeholders, including kids, schools (foodservice and education), early care and education (ECE) programs, agricultural producers, families and communities. Benefits exist in the areas of public health, economic development, education, environment, equity and community engagement.

Two children in aprons preparing food on a countertop.

Young Children Helping in the Kitchen

Young children love to be in the kitchen with their parents and other adults. Not only do they enjoy spending time with you, but they also love being able to make themselves something to eat.

Two young girls enjoying healthy snacks after school. Courtesy: Bob Nichols, USDA [CC BY 2.0].

Fueled for Fun!

This activity is appropriate for Pre-K-2nd grade (ages 4-7) and can be used by classrooms, small groups, or individuals.

Young girl decorating two cans for saving and spending.

Teaching Children About Money

Children are not born with “money sense.” However, parents can help children understand money matters by letting them take part in regular discussions about using family income.

Three children working in a community garden.

What is Farm to School and Early Care and Education?

Farm-to-school enriches the connection communities have with fresh, healthy food and local food producers by changing food purchasing and education practices at schools and early childhood education settings.