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Teardrop shaped tick with a dark brown body and legs and an elongate white patch behind its head.

Ticks Becoming Active in South Dakota

The arrival of spring in South Dakota means warmer weather and more outdoor activities. However, it also brings an increase in tick activity.

Adult female emerald ash borer

Emerald Ash Borer Insecticide Treatment Options

Fact sheet about insecticide treatment options for protecting ash trees against emerald ash borer.

Young woman applying insect repellant before an evening hike.

Enjoying the Outdoors Without Tick and Mosquito Bites

Outdoor activities seem extra inviting this time of year, and many people are already enjoying the long days and warmer temperatures. Ticks and mosquitoes share the outdoors with us, but there are things you can do to prevent bites from both.

A pasture containing a mixture of grasses and alfalfa.

An identification guide for Alfalfa Insect Pests in South Dakota

Pictorial guide for common insect pests of alfalfa in South Dakota

A sprawling sorghum field ready for harvest

An identification guide for Sorghum Insect Pests in South Dakota

Pictorial guide for common insect pests of sorghum in South Dakota.

Field with field peas and blue sky with fluffy white clouds

Production and Utilization of Field Peas in South Dakota

Guide to field pea production and utilization in South Dakota

Two mosquitoe samples side-by-side. The one on the left is labeled "A". The right one is labeled "B".

Know Your Mosquitoes to Protect Yourself

Mosquito trapping efforts across the state in the last seven years showed that there are over 20 species of mosquitoes occurring in South Dakota, yet only two species dominate the surveillance data: Aedes vexans and Culex tarsalis.

a person putting tomatoes into a bag.

Growing Tomatoes in South Dakota

Few vegetables inspire us more than home-grown tomatoes, bursting with vine-ripe flavor. Tomatoes are easy to grow in containers or in the ground, and are excellent sources of vitamins A and C, as well as cancer-fighting lycopenes.

Tick that is dark brown to black in color with a reddish-orange abdomen.

Protecting Yourself From Ticks

During wet springs, tick populations tend to thrive in South Dakota. These parasitic arthropods require blood to fulfill their nutritional needs and commonly use humans as a host. Some ticks can also carry bacterial diseases that are a threat to human health.

Tick that is dark brown to black in color with a reddish-orange abdomen.

An identification guide to common Ticks of South Dakota

A guide to identifying common ticks in South Dakota