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Cover crops growing in a field of harvested corn.

Utilizing Cover Crops for Grazing: An Assessment on Economic Benefits

Grazing cover crops by cattle provides an option to offset cover crop seed costs and increase farm revenue. To facilitate farmers’ decision making, this article will evaluate the economic profitability from grazing cattle on cover crops using a partial budgeting approach.

A pile of sheep fleeces ready for sorting.

Considerations for Increasing Wool Value

The wool market continually rewards those who emphasize high-quality production. Efforts to increase wool clip value can be made through regular management practices and proper wool clip preparation at shearing.

Cover Crop Adoption: Farmers’ perceived benefits & barriers

Cover crops are generally defined as crops planted between cash crops to cover and protect the soil. Some demonstrated benefits of cover crops include: reduced soil erosion, increased soil organic matter, increased biological diversity, increased nitrogen supply, and weed control. Depending on the farmers’ objectives, different species of cover crops can be planted. For example, if a farmer’s main objective is to increase nitrogen supply, then legume cover crops best suited to the farm area should be selected.

A lush field with corn, soybean, and forage rotation.

Crop Diversification Potential: Improving Soil Health & Farm Profitability

Two-year corn-soybean rotation coupled with heavy chemical inputs has become the routine practice of agricultural production in the Midwestern United States. According to USDA/NASS data, corn and soybean prices received by producers in South Dakota both reached the peak levels of $7.39 and $16.00 per bushel, respectively, in August, 2012.

A red tractor and seed drill planting in a no-till field.

Project to Study Soil Health Economics in South Dakota

Soil degradation has become one of the most pressing global issues, because of its adverse effects on world food security, environment and quality of life.

Several bottles of different hot sauces arranged on a counter.

How to Make a Safe Hot Sauce

Hot sauces can be made to with a combination of several different ingredients to give unique flavors and heat that consumers enjoy. There are many considerations that should be made on how hot sauces are processed, formulated and packaged.

Baskets of fresh vegetables at a farmers market

Local Foods: Whole Fresh Vegetables and Herbs

Fresh, whole raw fruits and vegetables grown in South Dakota can currently be sold without a food service license from the South Dakota Department of Health.

The La Montanita Co-op Veteran Farm Project (VFP) in Albuquerque, NM.

Training Gardens and Business Incubators

Community gardens are associated with urban areas and food production. However, community gardens can also be used as job training sites or small business incubators.

A woman rinsing vegetables off in an outdoor sink.

Food Safety Rules for Fruit & Vegetable Growers: FAQ

It seems rules and guidelines for growing fresh produce safely are constantly changing, as new laws and regulations are implemented each year.

A young girl with a snail-shaped watering can.

Ages & Stages in the Garden: Ages 6-8

A garden can be used to teach many concepts to a board range of ages. When working with early elementary youth you will want to consider characteristics of their development when planning lessons and activities.