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A series of swine pens at a state fair.

5 Things Hog Producers Should Know: Flu at Swine Exhibitions 

Every year, thousands of youth across the country raise pigs and show them off at local exhibitions and county and state fairs. These experiences allow young people to learn about animal care and management, and also allow the public the rare opportunity to observe pig care and behavior.

small group of cattle resting near feed bunk

Liver Abscesses: The Unseen Profit Thief

Liver abscesses are a great example of an important value robber in feedlot cattle that’s not immediately apparent.

male 4-H youth showing a black beef cow

4-H Animal Projects Self-Identification Process FAQ

Self-identification of 4-H animal projects means the youth/family are responsible for proper and accurate animal data entry.

two young males with their show goats at a competition

4-H Youth Experience in Animal Projects – Purposes

4-H Youth Development must place an importance on developing “youth experience” versus “contest participation and competition."

Two young pigs inside a pork production facility.

Creating a Secure Pork Supply Plan

African Swine Fever and preparing for foreign animal disease outbreaks is at the forefront of people’s minds. Your state animal health officials offer guidance for participating in the Secure Pork Supply (SPS) Plan. Let’s take a closer look at the critical steps in developing a personalized SPS Plan for Continuity of Business.

male 4-H youth showing a black beef cow

Why Tattoo Your 4-H Livestock?

Proper identification of animals helps create an honest record keeping system. With current DNA blood typing procedures animals can be identified through parentage, but when it comes to everyday practices on the farm or ranch a good tattoo can be a huge time saver in the event of a lost ear tag.

A small group of black angus cattle in a feedlot.

Bigger Cattle. Warmer Weather. What Can Go Wrong?

The disruptions in the beef processing sector caused by COVID-19 continue to interfere with the orderly marketing of finished cattle. While we all hope that the situation is resolved quickly, the reality is that because the shipment of so many harvest-ready cattle has been delayed, there will be increased numbers of heavier cattle on feed for the foreseeable future.

A healthy, growing soybean field. Farmyard in the background.

Soybean Growers Sought for On-Farm Research Program

We want you! SDSU Extension and the South Dakota Soybean Research and Promotion Council are seeking South Dakota Soybean Growers willing to participate in a farmer-led on-farm research program.

an image of a field of soybeans

Soybean Production: Cost-effective pest management practices

Chemicals were one of the most expensive individual costs in soybean production, behind only to seed in the non-land cost category. The average cash-rent soybean production farms incurred a crop chemical cost of $39/ac in 2015, an 88% increase from 2010.

Soybean plants with wilting, cupped leaves as the result of dicamba herbicide damage.

South Dakota Herbicide Damage

As the spray season starts, it is always good to be aware of resources and testing facilities where you can send in possible herbicide-affected plant samples. SDSU Extension offers suggestions on how to handle possible herbicide damage situations as well as recommended labs that receive plant matter samples to test for herbicide residues.