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Woody looking zucchini plant.

What’s Killing My Zucchini and Squash Plants?

For many of us, this time of year is tough for our zucchini, squash and pumpkin plants. A close inspection of wilting plants may reveal a sawdust-like substance around the soil surface or on the base of the stem. When pushed, the plants typically break and reveal clear evidence of insect feeding through the stem.

Brown beetle with hairy body with black mottled pattern.

What are Those Large Beetles in My Garden?

One of the insects that starts to attract attention this time of year is the bumble flower beetle.

Black beetles with orange or yellow spots feeding on a ripe tomato.

Insects are Invading My Produce!

Ripe fruit that has been injured as well as ground fall fruits often attract undesirable insects into an area.

A map of South Dakota with several colored boxes indicating areas of increased flood risk. For a complete description, visit the National Weather Service website at: https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/long_range.php?wfo=fsd

Get to Know Your Local Emergency Management Director

The warmer weather and spring migration this March have us all thinking of better days ahead. Unfortunately, it also has us thinking about flooding again this spring.

A whiteboard outside a home pantry with a shopping list and a stock list.

Helpful Food & Shopping Tips During Unexpected Events

When faced with unexpected events, such as a health crisis or natural disaster, planning meals and grocery shopping often comes to mind along with questions: What should I plan to make? What groceries do I need?

Hands holding a notebook with a meal planning grid drawn out. The grid has sections for breakfast, lunch and dinner across several days.

Reduce Stress With Meal Planning

We all experience a variety of stress in everyday life. One way to reduce unnecessary stress is the plan meals in advance.

Green beetle larvae with a white stripe running down its body.

Alfalfa Weevil Activity Prediction Update: April 14, 2020

The alfalfa weevil is a major spring insect pest of South Dakota alfalfa. Before 2018, this insect was reported as having large populations throughout much of South Dakota. However, during 2018 and 2019, we received fewer reports of alfalfa weevils, which may have been a result of the cooler and wetter spring conditions that were observed.

Green beetle larvae with a white stripe running down its body.

Alfalfa Weevil Activity Prediction Update: April 20, 2020

During the last week, the colder weather that we experienced across South Dakota resulted in very little degree day accumulation. However, in some areas enough degree days have accumulated to potentially lead to adult activity within alfalfa fields.

A green tractor pulling a fertilizer wagon through a field of alfalfa.

Fertilizing Forages in South Dakota

Spring is a busy time for South Dakota farmers and ranchers with planting, calving, and other field preparations. Soil sampling and fertilizing pastures, alfalfa, or other forages might be overlooked.

Green beetle larvae with a white stripe running down its body.

Alfalfa Weevil Activity Prediction Update: April 27, 2020

It is finally warming up across much of South Dakota and that means the degree days are beginning to accumulate more rapidly. Alfalfa weevil activity is likely in areas around Rapid City, Hot Springs, Cottonwood, Mission, Pierre, Winner and Vermillion.