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Teardrop shaped tick with a dark brown body and legs and an elongate white patch behind its head.

Ticks Becoming Active in South Dakota

The arrival of spring in South Dakota means warmer weather and more outdoor activities. However, it also brings an increase in tick activity.

Mother and father with their two small children.

Join SDSU Extension Staff for a Virtual Coffee Break

June 06, 2020

Throughout the summer of 2020, SDSU Extension staff are hosting monthly virtual coffee breaks on a variety of topics.

Young woman applying insect repellant before an evening hike.

Enjoying the Outdoors Without Tick and Mosquito Bites

Outdoor activities seem extra inviting this time of year, and many people are already enjoying the long days and warmer temperatures. Ticks and mosquitoes share the outdoors with us, but there are things you can do to prevent bites from both.

Tim Schreiner at his food preservation booth at the Vermillion Area Farmers Market.

Schreiner Turns Backyard Hobby Into Community Support

Whether volunteering as a Master Gardener or a Master Food Preserver, Tim Schreiner says the interaction with people and seeing that “light bulb” moment after a conversation is really the fun part of the programs.

Cindy Jungman holding an award in front of an SDSU Extension Master Gardener Program banner.

Jungman Brightens Landscapes, Builds Lifelong Friendships

A Master Gardener for more than 20 years, Cindy Jungman says the continuous education the program offers has been valuable.

Woman browsing a digital tablet in her garden.

SDSU Extension Master Gardener Program Policy Guide

This guide offers current and prospective SDSU Extension Master Gardeners information on: applying for the program, maintaining certification, categorizing and reporting service hours, understanding the various levels of volunteer service and much more!

A young girl with a snail-shaped watering can.

Ages & Stages in the Garden: Ages 6-8

A garden can be used to teach many concepts to a board range of ages. When working with early elementary youth you will want to consider characteristics of their development when planning lessons and activities.

several children next to a raised garden

Ages & Stages in the Garden: 4-5 year olds

If considering a garden-based learning program for four to five year-old it is important to understand some of their developmental characteristics prior to planning your program. Young children’s abilities will differ greatly from older youth.

Ages & Stages in the Garden: Ages 9-11

When working with upper elementary youth in a garden consider their physical development and skill level as you develop learning activities. Nine to eleven year olds have better coordination and reaction time by this age, however sometimes dues to growth spurs there can be short-term issues with balance and coordination. Additionally, these children have more body strength and their hand dexterity has increased.

A group of three people pruning a tree.

Garden Clubs & Associations

Novice gardeners and master gardeners share a love of and respect for nature, which is one of the many reasons why they naturally seek out like-minded individuals to organize clubs or associations.