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Spring wheat emerging from a field of corn stubble.

Planting Spring Wheat Into Corn or Milo Residue: Considerations for Scab

Due to current grain prices and other reasons, growers may be considering planting spring wheat into fields that were planted to corn or milo last season. While this type of crop rotation is not generally recommended, economic and logistical challenges sometimes may dictate otherwise.

A green tractor pulling a fertilizer wagon through a field of alfalfa.

Fertilizing Forages in South Dakota

Spring is a busy time for South Dakota farmers and ranchers with planting, calving, and other field preparations. Soil sampling and fertilizing pastures, alfalfa, or other forages might be overlooked.

A small black bug with tan margins on the wings. This insect is resting on a blade of grass that is green with white spots.

Black Grass Bug Activity Expected in Coming Weeks

Spring green-up is the time to be watching for black grass bug activity. Large populations of this early-season pest can cause severe damage to pasture (up to 90% forage reduction) and infest the edges of wheat fields.

A collection of empty pesticide and herbicide containers.

Changes in Pesticide Applicator Certification During COVID-19

April 27, 2020

Due to office closures as a result of COVID-19, commercial pesticide applicator testing is currently unavailable at the SDSU Extension Regional Centers and county offices.

Spring wheat growing in a no-till field. Courtesy: USDA NRCS South Dakota, (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Chloride Fertilizers May Be Beneficial in Spring Wheat Production

Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, although not considered an essential nutrient, has long been observed to be highly beneficial to field crops. Chloride is known to play an essential role in plant development and osmoregulation.

A patch of soil with kochia weeds growing throughout.

Temperature and Herbicide Performance

In South Dakota, the spring can come with a wide range of temperature fluctuations. This will affect the performance of burndown herbicides. Depending upon the target weed, type of herbicide and application rate, there will likely be decreased weed control in cooler temperatures.

A red sprayer in a green field with a cloudy sky in the background.

How to Stop Drift

The goals of applying any crop protection products include: increasing effectiveness, mitigating drift, and maximizing profits. We will focus on mitigating drift, even though all three interact with each other.

Wheat plants exhibiting symptoms of tan spot and powdery mildew.

Does Early Fungicide at Tillering Result in a Profitable Yield?

Tan spot and powdery mildew pathogens are two residue-borne pathogens that can infect wheat early in the season. These diseases can lead to poor tillering, and their continued development can lead to yield loss.

A few wheat plants showing heavy yellowing mosaic symptoms due to Wheat streak mosaic virus.

Wheat Streak Mosaic Disease Developing in Winter Wheat

Although the majority of winter wheat in the state is rated good to excellent in the recent USDA-NASS report, a few winter wheat fields in Central South Dakota have been diagnosed with wheat streak mosaic disease (WSMD) caused by wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV).

Hand holding herbicide sprayer over vegetable garden.

Organic Herbicides: Garden and Flower Bed Weed Control

Many South Dakota homeowners do not want to use inorganic or synthetic herbicides due to potential health impacts. Organic herbicides can be a useful tool for weed control when combined with other management practices.