Skip to main content

Search

A hand grabbing a loaf of bread from a shelf labeled "gluten-free"

Gluten Free Product Claim Guidance

While “gluten-free” is a voluntary claim that manufacturers may choose to use in the labeling of their foods, FDA’s gluten-free food labeling rule specifies what the claim actually means on a food label.

a mixture of fresh fruits and vegetables

Double Up Bucks Program Launches in Grocery Stores across South Dakota and North Dakota

January 21, 2020

The launch of the Double Up Dakota Bucks in grocery stores is the first of its kind in both North and South Dakota.

A family planting vegetables in a raised bed garden.

Building Your Farm to School Team

One of the first steps to take when starting with farm to school is developing your farm to school team. Putting together a farm to school team should include a core group of individuals and agencies who are dedicated to the farm to school mission.

A variety of fresh, garden vegetables sitting on a wooden fence.

School Purchasing Guide and Menu Planning

Getting started with implementing farm to school can be challenging and can bring on many questions. A big question that many schools have is: Why local?

A group of tribal educators and wellness coalition members visiting a geothermal greenhouse growing and selling citrus fruits in cold Northern Nebraska in January.

Producer Farm to School Guide

Producers have an avenue to provide their products that they might not have known about or may have question on how they can access this opportunity. Local schools are an excellent source for local producers to provide healthy options for students in their communities.

A newly planted vineyard on a rural property.

Grape Production Resources

Quality wine grapes can be grown in South Dakota with careful attention to growing site, cultivar selection and production techniques. View selected information available from SDSU Extension and other sources that will help you in deciding whether grape growing is for you, and to grow quality fruit.

A young girl with a snail-shaped watering can.

Ages & Stages in the Garden: Ages 6-8

A garden can be used to teach many concepts to a board range of ages. When working with early elementary youth you will want to consider characteristics of their development when planning lessons and activities.

A young, freckled girl eating small, red tomatoes inside a greenhouse.

Agritourism

When a producer has decided to sell a product directly from the farm, entertainment or tourism-based activities could be incorporated to create larger appeal. Agritourism could add value to the farm visit though education, entertainment, outdoor recreation, dining, relaxation or other avenues, potentially drawing more customers in.

A community garden plot with several tomato plants growing.

Community Gardens: Garden Rules - Operational Guidelines

When developing garden rules or participate guidelines it is important to address activities related to the operations of the garden. Clearly state that gardeners are expected to maintain their plot for the entire season and list the dates of the season during which they are responsible.

Ages & Stages in the Garden: Ages 9-11

When working with upper elementary youth in a garden consider their physical development and skill level as you develop learning activities. Nine to eleven year olds have better coordination and reaction time by this age, however sometimes dues to growth spurs there can be short-term issues with balance and coordination. Additionally, these children have more body strength and their hand dexterity has increased.