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A stand of field peas mixed with small grains being grown for forage.

Peas Offer Options in 2020

Current events have made decisions around crop options very difficult this spring. Field peas are an option that may have a fit for some producers.

A green tractor pulling a fertilizer wagon through a field of alfalfa.

Fertilizing Forages in South Dakota

Spring is a busy time for South Dakota farmers and ranchers with planting, calving, and other field preparations. Soil sampling and fertilizing pastures, alfalfa, or other forages might be overlooked.

A lush, green cluster of garden peas with several pods developed.

How to Grow It: Peas

The most common type of pea in American gardens is the shelling pea, also called the “garden pea” or “English pea.” Tender, sweet peas are removed from thin, tough pods before eating.

A field of flowering alfalfa.

Precautions for Grazing Weevil-Infested Alfalfa

Alfalfa weevil populations are high this year, creating challenges for producers. Questions have arisen on how to get some value out of the forage by grazing it rather than putting it up for hay.

A side-by-side comparison of two oat varietes. The one on the right has crown rust developing on it.

Utilize a Fungicide For Crown Rust Prevention in Oats

If you are growing oats this year for grain, be sure to scout and plan a fungicide application to protect the oats from crown rust.

a strand of oats in a field

Using Plant Growth Regulator in Oats Grown for Grain

With growers’ interest emerging, SDSU Extension and research faculty teamed up and initiated a study in 2016 in Northeast SD to evaluate the effects of plant growth regulator. The study was conducted at the SDSU Northeast Research Farm (NERF) near South Shore, SD.

A sprawling green field of field pea plantings

Production and Utilization of Field Peas, Lentils and Chickpeas in South Dakota

Dry field peas and lentils are high in protein and fiber, have a low glycemic index, are easy to prepare, store well, and are low in cost. Even better they can be produced economically and sustainably in South Dakota as part of diverse no-till crop production systems.

Winter wheat emerging from a planted field.

Double-Crop after Wheat?

Two crops in one year may sound tempting, and for some crop species is possible, but before doing so, producers should consider possible crops and compare the potential benefits with the drawbacks.

Sunish Sehgal combining a field of wheat

Growth Stages of Wheat

Management decisions in wheat production are almost always based on growth stages of the crop. So it is important for wheat producers to be familiar with these growth stages.

A group of people observing flats of microgreens in a greenhouse.

Growing Micro-Greens

As the name implies, micro-greens are grown only for a short time before they are harvested, usually only for about three weeks!