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SDSU Extension Hosts 2018 Nitrate Quick Test Training

December 18, 2018

SDSU Extension will be hosting Nitrate Quick Test Recertification and New Certification Training throughout June.

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High Nitrates Detected in Forages

December 18, 2018

High level of nitrates have been detected in South Dakota forages this growing season. SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist Robin Salverson encourages livestock producers to get their forages tested for nitrates before feeding.

A green front-end-loader pulling a hay mower with a flushing bar.

Haying With Wildlife in Mind

Anyone who has spent time cutting hay knows that hayland can be a magnet for wildlife in late spring and early summer. Hay fields are often considered an “ecological trap” for wildlife; that is, they appear to be high quality habitat for nesting or feeding due to tall, dense grass and legumes, but often lead to increased mortality once harvesting is under way.

A large pile of silage on a farm lot.

High-Quality Silage Making & Safe Practices: Both are necessities

Throughout the forage growing season many producers are putting up silage piles. To this point they have been predominately forages such as haylage or small grain silage; however, we will soon be moving into corn silage cutting season.

Freshly cut hay in a field.

Determining Hay Prices

Before pricing forages, producers will want to have a good understanding about the cost of growing a ton of hay, alfalfa or straw.

cows eating silage

What’s Important to Know About Silage Additives & Inoculants? 

Corn is suited to preservation as silage. Silage additives can be used to remedy deficiencies such as lack of sufficient population of bacteria to support adequate fermentation, and low levels of fermentable carbohydrates.

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Tips to Consider when Stacking and Storing Hay This Season

February 04, 2019

No matter what materials hay producers choose to bind forage with, the method of storage throughout the summer, into the fall and winter is important to maintaining forage quality, as well as minimizing waste and simultaneously cost of production.

harvester chopping corn silage, depositing silage into green wagon.

Silage: Minimizing Losses & Maximizing Value

Optimizing silage value starts by harvesting at the right moisture content.

tractor near pile of harvested silage

Silage Moisture Testing Tips

Two key points to keep in mind when making high-quality silage are moisture content before harvest and nutrient content before feeding.

blades of brome grass with a brown to black, thumbnail-shaped growth on one of the blades.

Ergot: A Potential Livestock Poisoning Problem

Cool, damp weather followed by warmer temperatures favors grasses becoming infected with ergot bodies. Ergot bodies can cause a certain kind of poisoning that affects cattle on pasture.